split note when slurring the harmonic scale?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Dark Knight, Sep 10, 2010.

  1. Dark Knight

    Dark Knight Pianissimo User

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    Just to let you know. The trumpet professor at my university has confirmed that he will take me on once his schedule stabilizes within the first week or two at school. This is the greatest news for me.

    However, until then, I do have another question. I continue slurring the harmonic scale. My favorite exercise. I am now able to start on low F# (1,2,3) and go all the way up to fifth line F# (1,2,3). I now find it a comfortable thing to do. There is what I think is an odd problem. Going up the scale is actually very clean. Going down from fifth line F# to E just below is not. When slurring down from fifth line F# to fourth space E, I accidentally play a weird note in between the two on the way down. Is this what they call a “split note”? I find it VERY difficult to go from fifth line F# directly down to fourth space E and just lock it in. It is like the very tip of my top lip does an extra flap or something. It is quite odd because I do not find it difficult to play the notes.
    (FYI, jaw is hurting much less now.)
    Any thoughts?

    Best Wishes,
    DK
     
  2. hup_d_dup

    hup_d_dup Piano User

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    Tewksbury, NJ, USA
    Dark Knight, if I understand your post, you have a problem with the transition from top line F# (1,2,3) to fourth line E (0). The normal fingering for top line F# is 2nd valve (2) and you will probably find the transition from 2 to 0 easier than 1,2,3 to 0.

    However, E is not actually the correct note to play in an F# harmonic scale; it should be E# (1). So the notes and fingering you should be using are F# (2) and E# (1). This should be considerably easier than playing 1,2,3 to 0.
     
  3. Dark Knight

    Dark Knight Pianissimo User

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    Yes, you are correct about the fingerings. The Table of Harmonics shows the seven finger combinations and possible tones, "althought some may be badly out of tune."

    So, for example: low F#, C#, first space F#, A#, middle C#, natural E then fifth line F# can all be obtained with the 1,2,3 fingering. I have been slurring this up and down as an exercise and have just start to do the 1 and 3 combination from low G to top line G.

    At any rate, the difficulty is between the top two notes on the way down between top F# and E with alternate 1,2,3 fingering. Maybe it is "normal" problem and just requires hard work, or there is too much or too little curl in the upper lip... etc.

    Thanks for think about it.

    DK
     
  4. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Never used 123 for E before. Just tried it and it sounds WICKED. I would just keep practicing it. Didn't have a problem with it, but I also do a lot of slurring exercises.
     
  5. Dark Knight

    Dark Knight Pianissimo User

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    tobylou8,

    Thanks. Then practice I will.....

    DK
     
  6. hup_d_dup

    hup_d_dup Piano User

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    Tewksbury, NJ, USA
    The fingerings you are using for the slurring exercises are correct ... in a slurring exercise you want to change the pitch but not the valve combination. However, many of these notes, particularly in the higher pitches, use alternate fingerings that are usually inappropriate for other applications. Generally, 2 is the standard fingering for F# at the top of the staff – that's the fingering you want to use for scales, playing songs, and other non-slurring exercises. For slurring exercises, the fingering for F# could be 2, 2-3, or 1-2-3 depending on what your starting pitch is.

    Your trumpet teacher will explain all this to you, but in the meantime you could get a headstart by finding a fingering chart.
     
  7. Bruce Lee

    Bruce Lee Piano User

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    Oct 24, 2003
    Rochester, NY
    The 1,2,3 valve combination requires that we extend the 3rd valve slide in order to play those notes in tune. We need to rely on our ear as to exactly how much to extend the slide, but that should help... even if they are false fingerings.

    Ciao,
    Bruce
     
  8. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    The exercise you describe is not a harmonic scale but flexabilty/lip slurs using the harmonic series on the trumpet. It's not a scale as define in music. A small but important distinction. The only time harmonic is used with a scale is in the Harmonic Minor Scale. Example: a C Harmonic Minor Scale: C, D, Eb, F, G, Ab, B, C
     
  9. Jerry Freedman

    Jerry Freedman Piano User

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    A teacher once told me ( and I beleive it) that some times we frack because the note we are going for is out of tune. I was playing an etude from Bousquet and I was always blowing F at the top of the staff. My teacher told me to pull out the first valve slide a bit to keep the note in tune....worked.
     
  10. Dark Knight

    Dark Knight Pianissimo User

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    Thanks Bob. I am still learning these things and it is good to know. I will try using the third valve slide this week and see how it goes. Thanks Jerry.

    Here is the real funny thing I have been thinking lately. In my day job, I am very confident in what I am doing and have a position with responsibility. I never doubt myself. Now, when it comes to the trumpet, I feel like I am always doing to something wrong because what comes out of the bell is not always what I like.

    DK
     

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