Spray can laquer

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by coolerdave, Jun 21, 2011.

  1. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    Has anyone tried using spray can laquer (made for brass instruments)?
    I was thinking it might work but was wondering what you would sand it down with ..and is it any good.
     
  2. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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  3. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    I remember that thread. I am going the try the spray laquer on a cheap horn if I can find one. I am trying to flip horns and can clean them up pretty well and still experimenting with the wax thing. I just don't want to sell a horn to some parent and then have it turn brown on them because they didn't listen to me when I said use some spray car wax on it once a week.
    I am more concerned about the smoothness of the finish. I know in cars you have to "rub" out the laquer to get a smooth luster.
     
  4. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    If you lay it on right, no rubbing out is needed. I doubt any good techs who lacquer horns rub the finish out. That said, I've never had any luck getting spray can lacquer to stick to a horn for an extended period. I've gotten a nice-enough look to the finish, but it won't stand up long to handling and playing.
     
  5. mrsemman

    mrsemman Piano User

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    I have used it a couple of times. I usually use it after repairing a dent(s); and after sanding the higher areas down and buffing. I found that if, after buffing the horn down, and wiping with lacquer thinner to degrease the horn, it works pretty well. I do not find a need to sand in between coats. Just remember to use real short bursts of spray.
     
  6. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    That is the reason (plus the toxic accelerant chemicals) that I won't use it anymore.

    I used to buff the area, degrease it, and then spray with the touch up lacquer - next time the horn came in for a cleaning my waste trap would be clogged by the peeled off lacquer:evil:
     
  7. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    Why does the laquer come off if the horn is clean? Do you bake your laquer on Ivan for the Diamond? ... or is that a trade secret :)
     
  8. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    I make prototypes here in my shop. Production happens in Europe, which keeps the price down. They have multi-station automated ultrasonic degreasing, and all the booths, ovens and air scrubbing equipment for lacquering.

    When I need something lacquered here in the US, I send it to Tom Green; this is where my Peppy trombone bells are done.
     
  9. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    Thanks Ivan.. I take it can't just sticky my horn in the oven or use a blow dryer than :thumbsup:
     
  10. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    Any finish, be it paint or clear, that comes in a spray can is not meant to be heat treated.
    Also, none of them will last if the area is handled frequently.

    If you want it (a clear or painted finish) to last you have to send it to a professional shop, unless you plan to just hang the horn on a wall and never touch it.

    Now, 2 part epoxy is a different story, it will last. But good luck trying to get a smooth finish.

    GZ
     

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