"Squeaking" Notes to Help Increase Range

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by BigSwingFace, Mar 21, 2014.

  1. BigSwingFace

    BigSwingFace Pianissimo User

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    Hi all,

    I've heard several pro trumpet players (most recently Greg Spence) talk about trying to increase range by playing as quietly possible. I believe this harkens back to the Cat Anderson whisper G; building range by finding the correct slot and THEN worrying about volume. Is this a consensus among trumpeters?

    To be honest, my highest "on demand" note is an E, but I can get up to a double C if I play very quietly. My question is this: Is there a real difference between Cat Anderson's whisper and a squeak? I feel like I'm working in the right direction - I'm not mindlessly blowing and hoping for a higher note. It's also helped me to play with much less pressure since I've been able to teach my muscles a double C requires very little force. Has anyone increased their range in the way I described?

    As always...feel free to direct me to an existing thread if I'm accidentally rehashing something.
     
  2. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    I think what you say is accurate.
     
  3. trumpetdiva1

    trumpetdiva1 Piano User

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    That is what Laurie Frink suggested to me. That is how I got my A's in a previous comeback (not this one--at least not yet). I let her know that I never saw A's in music before (only high G's) and she told me that I would and I did see them in the lead trumpet part in big band just before I left for NYC. It worked for me.

    Janell
     
  4. Bauerbear

    Bauerbear Mezzo Piano User

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    I know I'll be in the minority here, but I've always felt that although a trumpet CAN play above high C, they don't necessarily sound good there. I've always been of the opinion that trumpets were truly designed to play and sound beautiful in and just above the staff.


    Conversely, my niece (learning trumpet in middle school) told me that their teacher hasn't taught them to play or the fingerings for notes below low C. That shocked me. I know I don't play a bottom G in written music, but I usually play it to warm up.
     
  5. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    D's are very common in lead books, and in our's (17 piece big band) their are plenty E's, F's and G's.

    Like it or not, modern lead jazz, pop and pit charts often go up to G and A.
     
  6. BigSwingFace

    BigSwingFace Pianissimo User

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    Then it is a poorly designed instrument.
     
  7. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    The low notes need to be owned to play high. Whisper squeaks are good to get the right setting to develop the note, but squeaks are not a whisper note. A whisper note is sustained, and by definition will be controlled and owned.

    Range from C below bottom C to a high G is a reasonable expectation for a lead player. Develop that base note to get the top note. IMO
     
  8. Rapier

    Rapier Forte User

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    In my orchestra pad at the moment I am required to play G below the staff, to E above the staff. Which is fortunate, as that is my usable range. I can squeak out the F and occasional G, but don't own them.
     
  9. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    I think the Cat Anderson method is tantamount to playing long soft notes in the staff (notably the second line G) -- however the method that I have of his expands on that gradually in that you go up the scale --- in soft long tones. I never see anywhere in the method where it even suggests " SQUEAKS" to get to another level. The whole concept is to build your muscles in your embouchure at a much lower tonality (easier notes that you can sustain) -- this is like weight lifting on weights you can handle without busting your gut or getting a hernia. SO, if you were to ask me --- I say you have to own the note with a soft long tone for at least 8 or 12 beats --- then you work your way up from that. I don't believe you actually get there overnight, or in a month. -- but given 6, 10, 12 months a few years -- I think you won't need to worry about "SQUEAKING" a note to get higher notes --- by then (if you follow the Cat Anderson method -- long soft tones gradually higher) -- well, by then you will have earned your notes --- and you will be able to play them.
    the big key is light pressure, a small aperture, the correct air speed, and definitely the embouchure muscles to hold all this in place.

    ps. the Cat Anderson Method I have also has much faster 16th notes and scales incorporated in it at the end of each lesson, so it is not all "middle G"
     
  10. BigSwingFace

    BigSwingFace Pianissimo User

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    I blame myself but I think there's a misunderstanding. When I say squeak I mean the tone is very focused with no colours or overtones. It almost feels like I'm whistling through the horn. I can sustain the note, but I cannot play it with great volume.
     

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