Squealing*

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by butxifxnot, Jun 27, 2005.

  1. butxifxnot

    butxifxnot Pianissimo User

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    Jul 10, 2004
    Here...
    On top of getting that beautiful Wynton Marsalis sound with the accompanying outstanding range flexability and usage of the above with much speed :cool: , I'm also working on getting a good squeal (for now an F). Any tips? ie how to work on it, get it consistent, loud, and what to look out for??

    [edit]See post Tue Jul 12, 2005 9:27 pm
     
  2. Bear

    Bear Forte User

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    Apr 30, 2004
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    I don't think you want a sqeual... Squealin' is useless. I think you want a big PHAT sound with some brillance in the altissimo registers. I don't know what works for others but I simply do scales, arpeggios, Arbans, etc. Go as high as ya can adn try to add a SOLID step a week or so. OWN the notes. Be a real musician. just my 2 cents.
     
  3. butxifxnot

    butxifxnot Pianissimo User

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    Jul 10, 2004
    Here...
    Squealing, useless? Maybe in symphony, but not in marching band. That's what I'm dealing with right now. The 'owning' I have up to a good D. Past that it is wimpy squealing. There is a certain feel to a squeal that is not characteristic of normal notes and has a power behind it, I've seen. ...
    THX for the input. :-)
     
  4. djm6701

    djm6701 Pianissimo User

    I agree with the Bear up there - forget the squeal sound and go for a big fat upper register with a centered, resonant tone.

    Last night I was at the Toronto Downtown Jazz Festival watching the Dizzy Gillespie All-Star Tribute Band. Trumpet section was (believe it or not) Roy Hargrove, Claudio Roditi, Greg Gisbert, and a fellow whose name I didn't know playing lead. He absolutely took the walls down with a clear strong sound. That's the sound I look for in lead.
     
  5. trumpet blower88

    trumpet blower88 Mezzo Piano User

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    Even in marching band, you still don't want to squeal... I know what your talking about though, like the lead soprano in last years Blue Devils show? I'm pretty sure thats what you want to sound like, and that is most definatly not "squealing". I think you have been useing the wrong word to describe this kind of playing, because squealing is not musical in any genre, "a squealing trumpet only makes babies want to cry, and grannies want to die", in the words of my old section leader.
    So for the rest of this post, lets refer to this "squealing" as a "boisterous, obtrusive, ear pierceing, incredibly high, beutiful tone"

    Now, if you want to play with a boisterous, obtrusive, ear pierceing, incredibly high, beutiful tone, I would sugest starting off nice and low and push as much air though the horn as you can to make just the thickest, fattest, loudest, most amazeing sound you've ever made. Start with something comfortable, a G or C in the staff would work fine. Once you get comfortable with that, start going up chromaticaly stoping on each note and just blowing more air than you've ever blown though the horn befor. Don't go to far though and and mess up your pitch or start to get a crappy tone, keep it beutiful, you have to be sensitive enough that you can still get that boisterous, obtrusive, ear pierceing, incredibly high, beutiful tone, but still makeing it sound good. If you blow to hard and loose control of yourself, then you get the squealing... and remember... we don't want babies crying and grannies dieing... we want a boisterous, obtrusive, ear pierceing, incredibly high, beutiful tone.
    The main thing you need to work on for makeing a boisterous, obtrusive, ear pierceing, incredibly high, beutiful tone, is air support. You need to keep the air pressure at just the right amount, useing too much will cause you to squeal, and not useing enough will cause you to loose dynamics, tone, and make you go flat. You need to keep the air in your lungs at a constant and comfortable pressure, it's very important! There is a video that has been mentioned on here several times befor, it's made by two of the best tuba players in the world, Pat Sheridon and Sam Pilaphian (I know I spelled that wrong...) I would deffinatly suggest you watch those videos and practice these breating excersizes daily. My highschool works on breathing exercises for about 15 to 20 minuets every day and I strongly believe that it is because of our dedication to breathing that we are ranked as one of the top 5 in the state.
    Playing a boisterous, obtrusive, ear pierceing, incredibly high, beutiful tone is all about your airflow. Practices this everyday and in just a couple weeks you'll probably be hitting higher notes with a bigger and fatter sound.
    Some more litle, less important advice to you is to stop calling is "squealing"... You do not want to squeal, it's gross and discusting. If you want to here squealing, all you have to do is go stand in the warm up area of a "less outstanding" highschool marching band and hear the 1st and 2nd trumpet trying to see who can play higher and louder, that is squealing. If you want to hear a boisterous, obtrusive, ear pierceing, incredibly high, beutiful tone, then listen to the Blue Devils show on the 2004 season cd, about 2 1/2 minuets into the show you will hear a boisterous, obtrusive, ear pierceing, incredibly high, beutiful tone... that is not squealing...

    Wow, sorry about the length of this post... I wasn't expecting myself to write a novel...
     
  6. Bear

    Bear Forte User

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    USA
    quote]Squealing, useless? Maybe in symphony, but not in marching band. That's what I'm dealing with right now. The 'owning' I have up to a good D. Past that it is wimpy squealing. There is a certain feel to a squeal that is not characteristic of normal notes and has a power behind it, I've seen. ...THX for the input. :-)[/quote]

    Lol, I don't want to start a fight man but I'm not a legit player. I have done yrs of marching band playing soprano. I'm a jazz lead cat. In any genre you do NOT want a "squeally" sound. It is totally possible to have a huge, phat, gorgeous flowing sound up to and beyond a DHC. Just takes a little work and a lot of patience and thinkin'. Just tryin' to help you. Sorry if I offended you or seemed to talk down to you.
     
  7. Rick Chartrand

    Rick Chartrand Piano User

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    Nov 22, 2004
    Toronto Canada
    Hey guys

    Dylan is right...Pigs squeel, not trumpet players who play properly. I have several things to say on this subject. Go for that controled dark centered sound. The best way to acheive it is through years of lip development and a good large cup deep mouthpiece like a Bach 1c. Some might whine (years ago myself included) that a 1c is to hard to play, but once you develop your lip with tons of arpegios and have the sound, then you have it.

    Many might think incorrectly that the best horn gives the best sound...Not so. If you are a great musician then no matter what horn you play, you will sound good. Case and point, I was recently forced to play a student trumpet at a gig, and still got tons of compliments on my playing and tone.

    A good mouthpiece is the most single important factor that will shape your lip and your sound. Theres no need for Monettes, they are in my opinion a waste of money. I play a $1000 horn and because of my technique and mouthpiece, Ive been told than I sound as good as Wynton.

    Dont get me wrong, Wynton is a great musician, he has been playing for, and is at about the same level of musicianship as I am, but if you put a good 1c mouthpiece and a Martin Committee in his hands, he'd sound pretty much the same as he does now. The reason Wynton plays a Monette is because he is a high profile musician and gets free horns from the company for his endorsement.

    Monette mouthpieces on the other hand in my opinion are a very economical way to impove your tone 100% and are totally worth the $200 or so investment. But $10,000 for a trumpet??? C'mon!

    As one reviewer so eliquently put it years ago... ''You could put a garbage can of a horn in Miles Davis' hands, and he'd still sound great!'' Musicianship is everything.

    Perfect practise gives Perfect Results.

    Rick AKA Trumpet Man
     
  8. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

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    Brooklyn,NY
    It was probably Frank Greene. I weigh about 170 and I am darn near 6 ft. tall, I did a sub for Jimmy Owens in a section that was lead by Faddis. Frank Greene and Sean Jones were the other players. These guys are NFL size. I got to get to the gym :shock:
    Wilmer
     
  9. tromj

    tromj Piano User

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    Teaneck, NJ
    Frank greene

    Frank is a gezunt un Shtark fellow.
     
  10. Ryan

    Ryan New Friend

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    When I want to play high, I make sure during my warmups I play the highest note I have to play, and to get there I just play scales up. The highest I've played is an A above the A that is a ledger above the staff.
     

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