Squealing*

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by butxifxnot, Jun 27, 2005.

  1. Bear

    Bear Forte User

    1,255
    4
    Apr 30, 2004
    USA
    HA. I'm 6'1 and 320lbs... NFL size... but I still need to get to the gym too! lol, wanna be my workout buddy? lol. Take care.
     
  2. butxifxnot

    butxifxnot Pianissimo User

    150
    1
    Jul 10, 2004
    Here...
    :-) I think I'm going to like this website. Thanks, guys. I'll use this one as my response. Just FYI, I didn't realize that the term wasn't what I thought. Y'll know (thankfully) what I meant by "squealing": a "boisterous, obtrusive, ear pierceing, incredibly high, beutiful tone".
    What do you know? I switched to my fabulous 1C last year. It is the best mouthpiece I've ever had. Like I said, I have a comfortable C, a comfortable D, and past that it is at that point where I'm just saying "Maybe". On the mouthpiece, it sounds, but it has that weird feeling. I don't really know how to explain it. ... Is that undesireable? Or something to master regarding freakishly high notes?
    Got that right.
    Hat's off to you. One heck of a compliment.
    That's what I mean. When I say "squeal", I mean "playing up there and taking down the walls" and not "playing up there and leaving it dripping on the walls." :D
    I know the kind of sound you mean. You have a person with range, but not tone. What you get is a 'blatter'. I guess a 'squeal' is a 'blat' taken up an octave, eh?
    and not get the darn note... then it's a squeak.
    Breathing can do wonders. Here's a story for y'all (in exchange for all this that y'all are doing for this. I love this discussion) regarding breathing.
    A friend of mine is a fabulous trumpet player, who I disagree with some of what he does, but mostly we can each go to each other to sharpen each other's playing. He and I give trumpet lessons to little kids, and one of his kids (who, at the time, had the same director that my friend had when he was that age) had a little piece to play. They were about three years apart in playing experience. Now, this director emphasizes breathing more than pretty much anyone around here. My friend went and played the piece as far as they could in one breath and that little girl almost matched him. Now I find that amazing, because that would mean that little girl, at that time, breathed better than people with two years experience on my friend. I wish I could get my hands on that video. :-)
    :D No problem. Thank you all for your input. I like this site. My question, though, still stands for me:
     
  3. pops

    pops Pianissimo User

    70
    8
    Mar 17, 2004
    Dallas
    A squeel may make you feel good at it may impress the guy standing beside you BUT it will NEVER be heard across the field. A squeel don't carry. ONly you a a few friends will even know you did it.

    A total waste of time.
     
  4. butxifxnot

    butxifxnot Pianissimo User

    150
    1
    Jul 10, 2004
    Here...
    My saying 'squeal', as these fine players discerned, was not what I thought. It's not what you think, either. I know what you mean: a squeak. I now know that a squeal is a BLAT taken up an octave or two. Look to trumpet blower88 for what I actually mean by "squeal". :)

    I'm going to bump my last post, as I would like a response.
    quote=me:




     
  5. pmkt16

    pmkt16 New Friend

    43
    0
    Oct 24, 2004
    Chicago
    My advice for the top would be to work on it slowly. It still is early in the season, really really really early, so you have the advantage of not having to rush to try and get range you can do it right. A previous poster said to try and add a step a week and thats a good way to look at it, little steps, after 2 months (the beginning of the marching season) you'll have added an octave (in your case a solid double C). When I have worked on range in the past doing lots of pedal tone excercises and arrpegios. Two octave arpeggios starting on pedal C and then moving up a half step at a time until it doesn't sound good and then stop is always a lot of fun.


    I think to say that horn has nothing to do with how you sound is absurd. While you may be able to manipulate most horns to sound the way you want it takes more of an effort. I agree that the mouthpiece is probably the most important part of the equation as far as equipment is concerned a horn definitely makes a difference with how easy it is to get the desired results.


    Wynton pays for his Monette stuff just like everybody else who plays Monette gear.
     
  6. butxifxnot

    butxifxnot Pianissimo User

    150
    1
    Jul 10, 2004
    Here...
    If I had a solid double C at the beginning of marching season, I would be very excited. What do you suggest exercise-wise? (ie work up until it sounds bad, go down a half step and play around there?)
    ? Sounds good, but I don't entirely get it.
     
  7. pmkt16

    pmkt16 New Friend

    43
    0
    Oct 24, 2004
    Chicago
    Start on a pedal C and do a two octave major arpeggio. Continue on to a Pedal C# and do a two octave major arpeggio. Keep going until you can't play the notes at the top with a good sound. After doing this make sure to rest a while because you should really feel this, its a good workout. Another would be start on a G in the staff and play a measure of 8th notes at 120 and then play a measure on F# and then a measure on Ab so you are extending the interval between the notes you are playing chromatically, no rest between measures. Breath threw your nose so you don't give yourself a chance to reset your embouchure when the interval starts getting bigger. Continue until it's a two octave interval, low G to high G. You WILL feel this in your corners if you are doing it right and not cheating. Again as with the other one make sure to rest for a while afterwards.
     
  8. butxifxnot

    butxifxnot Pianissimo User

    150
    1
    Jul 10, 2004
    Here...
    :-) I like you. Thank you for the input and the idea. I'll try that and keep this in mind. Something tells me that'll also help me to get my transitioning from low embouchure to high more workable. Speaking of pedal C, listening to just a little bit of Claude Gordon play has helped me get that pedal C much easier. Something about that man's playing just teaches...
     
  9. butxifxnot

    butxifxnot Pianissimo User

    150
    1
    Jul 10, 2004
    Here...
    *Oh, here's an example of a 'squeal' that I was referring to (in the supporting trumpet section, there is, what I thought to be, a squealer, but I can tell now that that is not :-))
    http://www.trumpetstuff.com/images/Other/BumbleBee.ram
    [edit]Apart from a couple lower trumpet parts fraccing (and some bad accuracy :shock: ), this sounds pretty cool. :-)
     
  10. butxifxnot

    butxifxnot Pianissimo User

    150
    1
    Jul 10, 2004
    Here...
    2 questions:

    Does anyone here personally find any merits to a daily "stretching" of the range?

    And how to build up volume/power on a note that sounds, but not very loudly? Continued general practice? I know that solves everything else...

    :play:
     

Share This Page