Stale Air

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by tpetplyr, Dec 8, 2005.

  1. tpetplyr

    tpetplyr Pianissimo User

    205
    3
    Dec 15, 2003
    Boston
    I've played (within the last 36 hours) a jury and a concerto competition and recieved the same comments (not completely unexpected, considering the ajudicators were the same two professors) both times. The predominant comment was an observation that after I'm finished with a section (ie I have a few bars rest) I tend to exhale a large amount of air. He said that I was holding too much air inside and had too much tension while playing. I understand the problem but don't really know what to do about it. Since the semester is over this week (next is exams) I won't be with a teacher until January, and was wondering if you had any suggestions.

    Thanks
    Stuart
     
  2. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

    5,915
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    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    It sounds like you're tightening your gut and and squeezing out air instead of letting it out in an unrestricted fashion. The mouthpiece and the horn have enough resistance... don't add to it by tightening your gut as you exhale. Try to blow as though there is nothing in your way and maybe that'll help you use the air properly. Don't think of yourself hissin out air. Think of the air as being buoyant and free as you exhale. Maintain a good energy so you get a maximal float for your tone.

    ML
     
  3. W Scott

    W Scott Piano User

    488
    4
    Dec 8, 2003
    Carson City, NV.
    Do you have asthma? i ask because that seems to be a problem with asthmatics as they can get the air in, but we have a tough time getting it out--especially in the face of the resistance of the horn.

    I am an asthmatic and have had problems with holding air in. One exercise that is helping a lot is 20 minute long tones to a backing disc. Go to

    www.cdbaby.com

    Find Walter White's 'Long Tone Accompaniment' CD. The CD has four, 20 minute tracks. The tracks are 'New Age' in style and very meditative. Plug the CD in and blow one or two notes for twenty minutes while listening to the CD. The music calms you down and in turn that relaxes your entire breathing apparatus. The result is that you will start to breath correctly and you'll also be building your chops.

    Good luck!
    Bill
     
  4. tpetplyr

    tpetplyr Pianissimo User

    205
    3
    Dec 15, 2003
    Boston
    Is this in contradiction to my instructors repeated "Keep your gut out!!" as I'm playing? My response to that comment (which seemed to be to his satisfaction) was to push my abs out, exerting downward force on my ribcage, causing an exhale. What shoud I think about or feel instead?

    Yes. I'm impressed. I never thought about it imparing my exhale...I always felt that if I could breathe in comfortably I was fine. I might try the 20 minute G (possibly shorter) over break, though I find that excessive long tones tends to tighten me up. Perhaps Chicowicz or Stamp?

    Thanks for the help guys!

    Stuart
     
  5. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

    5,915
    10
    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    Wow...

    ...unfortunately, yes. You do not keep your gut out and push down internally as though you were defecating or giving birth. It's just wrong, sorry.

    You allow the abs to move inward like a slow sneeze or slow cough as you exhale. Please do a search about this as I and others have written extensively about the subject.
     

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