Starting my son in music

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by neal085, May 18, 2015.

  1. horner

    horner Pianissimo User

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    I'm kind of surprised that this isn't the popular answer, but if the kid wants to play trumpet, let him play trumpet.

    Various reason for this, including that he might actually practice the instrument and get better on it as it's something he wants to do; he might detest the instrument you choose for him and it could put him off completely; he'll still be learning to read music as he plays and you can cover any other theory you feel he needs to learn on the side; and you're a trumpet player yourself so will be able to help him, make sure he's playing in tune etc.

    Finally, why deny the kid the chance to have a go on something that he might end up loving for the rest of his life? That, to me anyway, makes no sense at all.

    (Just as a side note, starting aged 7 is extremely common in the UK and is pretty much the standard starting age for most young people's brass bands.)
     
  2. neal085

    neal085 Mezzo Forte User

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    I appreciate all the input so far - lots of wisdom and perspective to sort through and mull over, and I'll just say that you TM'ers are collectively awesome.

    I am, again, overwhelmed by the experience and wisdom available on this forum. Thank you all. Please don't stop.
     
  3. Dennis78

    Dennis78 Fortissimo User

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    Definitely start the kid on an instrument they fancy. Last year at a yard sale I was trying to unload an alto sax and a lady was looking to buy for $100-her offer for her son that wanted to play bone. She explained to me that if he like to play music and will stick with it then she'll look into getting a bone. I explained to her that in that kids head he hears the trombone and if he can't get that sound out of the sax he will most likely give up not to mention its a whole different class of instruments with a different skill set I advised her to rent for the first year and then make the call, and her boy's face lit up like I had a giant bag of candy. So let em play the trumpet
     
  4. neal085

    neal085 Mezzo Forte User

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    Well, after considering all the input from all of you, then talking to my wife and son, we're starting the squid on guitar lessons for the summer while he's out of school. It will give him something musical to work on during summer vacation, but won't take much away from his playtime and summer of being a kid - basically 30-45 minutes a day. Then in the fall, we'll re-evaluate where he's at.

    Some of the biggest considerations were:

    Wanting to introduce him to music, but not wanting to force him into a commitment he's not interested in
    Avoiding a big investment on the front end
    Availability of teachers/convenience
    A good deal on a decent 3/4 guitar

    We're also going to make sure to get him to some concerts during the year to expose him to different instruments and styles in a live setting. TCU has tons of free concerts throughout the year - orchestral, jazz, string ensembles, brass, etc. Something might stick to him that hasn't even occurred to us. Just hope it's not a bassoon or double bass. I feel pretty sure he'll end up on the trumpet, but we'll see.
     
  5. Dennis78

    Dennis78 Fortissimo User

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    Not many 3/4 guitars, acoustic guitars anyhow sound good tuned to concert pitch but are playable tuned to G. A nice parlor size would be a better fit for size a learning. Good luck to the "squid"
     
  6. DaChan

    DaChan Pianissimo User

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    Aug 10, 2014
    If he's got a way to jam he'll like it. That's how music works. I love the drums and never took lessons. I ownedan acoustickit for a yeat abd now have an electronic kit that needs a space to be set up. I'm not a great drummer but I don't care. The drop ms are fun, when I choose to play them. I love the trumpet. I'm OK on it, more than just OK I think. I enjoy the piano, but I'm not good. It is a great exercise. Its a great exploration. I'm not selling it. I like my trombone. Someday ill be able to play jazz on it... Some far in the future day. I have a guitar. It doesn't see any play. Maybe someday I'll be a beginner guitarist. They key is wanting to play. The rest comes naturally.
    Dude wants a trumpet. Trumpets can be had for cheap. Get a trumpet... And maybe something else. More importance, play with him. Borrow an instrument. Give em a lesson to get the first few notes to sound like something. Be encouraging but don't lie. Many start and most quit. Make it fun. I love music. I'll quit smoking before I quit music.
     
  7. Franklin D

    Franklin D Forte User

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    The problem of love for an instrument is just like love: it's mainly irrational.
    In fact there are a very few rational arguments, maybe none, to choose the trumpet.
    So if somebody wants to play the trumpet let him or her, love is in any case the best motivation.
     
  8. Dennis78

    Dennis78 Fortissimo User

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    Does he want to play guitar? I would have given up if I didn't get to play the horns I saw every year in the parade
     
  9. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Really, for your own health benefit quit smoking NOW!

    Had I quit much earlier ... really never started ... my present health certainly would be much better ... open heart surgery and COPD is not enjoyable. In hindsight, I could have bought quite a collection of musical instruments or other fine things with the monies I've spent on cigarettes and health care. Assuredly, I would have begun my come back earlier and possibly now have the endurance and opportunity to play many gigs. Still, I'm very fortunate to have lived 79 years and still have the avocation to enjoy playing the brass when so many other avocations I've had to quit. Too, now and again a few non-paying gigs ... solos in church ... or sounding Taps about reach my limits. I've not found a way to play my trumpet and walk in a parade now with my need of a cane ... not even the 3 blocks of the main street here in Jackson NC where the parades occur.
     
  10. neal085

    neal085 Mezzo Forte User

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    I think it's important to note that he's not asking to play anything. If I bring it up, he'll say he wants to play trumpet. But then next week he wants to play piano. And then drums. More recently, guitar has been added to the list. Like Patrick said, his primary goal in life is to get muddy and run around the back yard with guns and sticks and swords and make loud noises.

    My goal is just to get SOMETHING in his hands to introduce him to music and get him working on it, and I'm pretty sure he can always do the trumpet later, whether that's in 5 years or 5 days. I also think that we'll know a lot more about what he likes and wants to do once we get started, but the key is to get started. The mind at that age is such fertile ground, and I want to sow something productive that he'll have and enjoy the rest of his life.

    My mom taught me music on the piano when I was about his age. Today I can't play a thing on the piano, but I learned how music works, and it stuck with me. I never started on trumpet until I was 12.

    My niece (my son's cousin) is a year younger than him, and she recently went to her dad and said, "I want to play violin." Unequivocally. She begged him for a violin and lessons. That's what she WANTS to do, which to me is very different. Brennan isn't asking for anything. He's interested in all of it on some level, but not pursuing at this point.

    Now, if we talk after 2 months, or even 2 weeks of lessons and he wants to switch to something else or even quit altogether, I'm open to that conversation, but right now I'm just trying to put him on the road to music. I don't think he knows what he wants, but he might once he's been formally introduced to music. Starting him on guitar might prove to be the wrong decision, but I'm sure that will manifest itself soon enough, and I'm not worried about it. At this point, there's minimal commitment, and the the teacher we signed him up with understands and agrees with that for a student of his age.
     

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