sticky valves/tilted horn

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by crowmadic, Nov 4, 2006.

  1. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 3, 2006
    I have a 1970's Olds Ambassador that I find easy to play except for sticky valves. I cleaned throughly and tried a variety of oils. Noting did any good until I tilted the horn to the right. The valves NEVER STICK! I have other horns that I play in my usual up right position that don't stick. So I don't blame my finger position except on this Olds. I don't know if it's technique sensative, or if the valve casings are worn in a way where tilting to the right frees the valve return better. It really sticks when tilted to the left! I'm not nuts, this is how this horn is behaving. All comments welcomed except MAN YOU'RE CRAZY!
     
  2. trumpet blower88

    trumpet blower88 Mezzo Piano User

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    Just keep it tilted to the right. :)
     
  3. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 3, 2006
    David, David, David, any other wisdom beside "just tilt it to the right". How about: that makes sense because..........! Or, I know someone who had the same situation and he/she........! Or, It proves that you are playing.......! Or, I would never play a trumpet tilted. Or would you?
     
  4. Khora

    Khora Piano User

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    Sep 17, 2006
    New York
    It certainly sounds as if the casings or valves or guides are worn, which wouldn't be surprising in a 30 year old horn. Since it works when tilting to the right, but is worse to the left, I think the first thing to check is the guides - if they are worn, the valve isn't being held centered.

    Of course, every individual wears down the valves in a different way, since our fingers/hands/etc are different. If it has been your horn all along, then maybethe wear is catching up with you. If it was previously someone else's horn, your pattern is slightly different, and maybe is causing wear in a different spot.

    Either way, you might want to have a trusted repair person check it out.

    But no, you're not crazy - anything mechanical is apt to malfunction eventually!
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I also suspect that the valve guides are worn, and probably the springs too. If you really like the horn, invest a couple of bucks to get it checked and fixed. A horn that you are not 100% confident in will rob you of creative power and security on stage!
     
  6. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 3, 2006
    Khora you've been a big help. I've always given more importance to the valve casings when it comes to a persistant sticky valve, but now I'm going to focus on the guide and see what my repair guy can do to advise and provide. I like to do some work myself, especially when it's just replacing a simple part. Thanks again.
     
  7. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 3, 2006
    rowuk, you are so right about the confidence factor. You are a very generous member of TM and no boubt a good teacher. Thanks for all your responses to me=crowmadic.........
     

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