Stomvi Master Piccolo

Discussion in 'Horns' started by Mr. Stomvi, Jan 30, 2004.

  1. Mr. Stomvi

    Mr. Stomvi Pianissimo User

    211
    2
    Nov 14, 2003
    Hey Larry - Welcome to the Stomvi club. Your secret decoder ring and keys to the Stomvi executive washroom should be arriving shortly :D

    Just curious - which bells did you get with your new Stomvi Master picc ? When Jose Mecking at Cambrass fixed me up with one I got the solid sterling silver, gold plated brass and about a year later, a wooden one. I think I like the gold plated brass one best (response and tone quality) but I really like the look of the silver bell on the gold horn so I am probably going to have the gold bell silver plated (go figure). The wooden one is really interesting. I can't quite come to a decision about it though. The response is not quite as good as the other two but the tone quality is really kinda unique. Not as different as one might expect of a wooden bell though.

    Seth Moore

    Stomvi Master Ti picc - Stork 5P
    Stomvi Master Ti Bb - Warburton 4D
    Stomvi Master Ti cornet - Sparx 4, 4B, Wick RW4
     
  2. Larry Gianni

    Larry Gianni Piano User

    265
    4
    Nov 11, 2003
    Los Angeles
    Seth,

    Mikey just got one with the 3 bells you just memtioned, I'll let him go first.

    LG
     
  3. Mikey

    Mikey Forte User

    1,840
    2
    Oct 24, 2003
    Wow.............

    Yes, I just traded my Schilke P5-4 (plus $$) for a Stomvi Master picc. I also got the wooden bell. After playing this horn for 3 weeks, I have come to the conclusion (and my humble opinion) that this is the best piccolo I have ever played. It has qualities of a number of different piccolos. It is not my intent here to slam any other horn. I only mean that this horn has the qualities I have been looking for. Incredible intonation in both A and Bb, the ability to change sounds depending on the playing situation, very good projection, and a great core to the sound.

    Regarding the 3 bells: It is my opinion that the yellow brass bell works well for most general applications. The sterling bell projects and cuts through anything, without getting tinny or harsh. The sterling bell would be my choice for orchestral playing where you need to cut through, like with Petrouchka, Rite of Spring, Pictures, etc. The wooden bell is the "sleeper". While this bell does not have the core or projection of the other two, the sound I get reminds me of the old natural trumpets. I would try the wooden bell for chamber-type baroque music. Also, I find I can play very softly with very light attacks with the woody..

    In short, a great piccolo, and well worth the $$. It is my understanding that Maurice Andre helped design it, and he wanted it to have a combination of characteristcs from other horns he has used (mainly Selmer and Schilke).

    Mike
     
  4. Mikey

    Mikey Forte User

    1,840
    2
    Oct 24, 2003
    moved
     
  5. Anonymous

    Anonymous Forte User

    1,099
    4
    Oct 21, 2003
    Wooden Bell?

    Ok please explain!
     
  6. Mr. Stomvi

    Mr. Stomvi Pianissimo User

    211
    2
    Nov 14, 2003
    Stomvi stuff

    Trptmaster - What ?? Ya mean to tell us you don't own a trumpet with a wooden bell ??? Jeeeez :D Welcome to the world of Stomvi :D Stomvi offers interchangable bells (as well as leadpipes, tuning crooks, etc) on their Master series horns. You can get the bells (all screw on) made out of different materials, different weights, and with different tapers. They offer them in solid sterling silver, gold plated brass, copper, wood and they were going to offer them in belflex (carbon fiber) but they ended up not marketing the belflex models.

    I always tell people who ask what kind of wood they use (I don't really know) in the bells that the wood comes from the French Zebra tree that was in Maurice Andre's back yard. :D Hey - It sounds impressive. :D I'm guessing that the wood bells are fairly easy to make in comparison to regular bells as all you would have to do is spin them out on a lathe. Mine is in two pieces that were joined together and then turned down. It would be fun to set up an operation to turn these out and see what the differences in different wood would make on tone quality and response.

    If you think wooden bells are something - you should check out Stomvi's mouthpiece kits. Very cool. You can even get them in brass, silver, gold, titanium, ebonite and carbon fiber.

    It's too bad that Stomvi is not better known over here in the States. IMHO they are way, way out in front of the game.

    Seth Moore
     
  7. Larry Gianni

    Larry Gianni Piano User

    265
    4
    Nov 11, 2003
    Los Angeles
    Seth,

    I have the gold plated gold brass bell, the sterling silver bell, the wood bell and the " bellflex " bell that they stopped producing. I don't usually mention the 4th bell becasue you can't get them anymore, so what's the use.

    The bellflex is the dark looking bell in the adds and the wood is the light looking bell

    Mikey about covered the sounds very well. Way to go Mikey !!!

    Larry

    I just tried to copy and paste the master picc. with the wood bell from the stomvi site but was unable - sorry
     
  8. Mr. Stomvi

    Mr. Stomvi Pianissimo User

    211
    2
    Nov 14, 2003
    Stomvi stuff

    Larry - You have got to tell us what the belflex bell sounds and plays like ! You may be the only one on the planet who has one.

    Seth
     
  9. blutch

    blutch Pianissimo User

    68
    0
    Dec 25, 2004
    Oklahoma City
    I sold my gold plated Stomvi Master picc to buy a Schilke P7-4. I'd like to go back now. I am selling the P7 and on the lookout for a Stomvi Master. I've only done 3 performances and the Schilke and it is virtually brand new with no wear. Let me know if you are interested in a trade or straight purchase.

    Michael Anderson
     
  10. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

    3,825
    895
    Nov 16, 2005
    Antalya, Turkey
    Towards the end of his career, Maurice Andre endorsed Stomvi piccolo trumpets, made in Spain. For a while in the late 90s, they were sleepers because they were very high quality copies of the Schilke P5-4, but sold for a reasonable price. Lately the horns have become more expensive, the equal in price of Schilke and Kanstul, and interest has diminished, though they remain of very high quality construction, and very popular with a small group of enthusiasts. The Stomvi Elite sells for around $2150, and the Master, a bit over $2650. The Master has the unique feature of a screw bell design and comes with a gold plated yellow brass bell and a sterling silver bell. An optional ($600) bell is made of wood (pictured). Really. Stomvi has also lately added titanium parts such as valve guides and buttons. They've always favored a mixed gold and silver plated look, with the top of the line horns available in gold. Like with Schilke, I don't believe I've ever seen a lacquered Stomvi. The most comprehensive dealer of Stomvi instruments is Horn Haven, in Dallas, Texas.
    [​IMG]
     

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