stop playing when you're tired? or keep going?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by jamesfrmphilly, Apr 12, 2004.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    There are too many hyper, active (or was that hyperactive) players out there whose bodies never seem to get enough. And then there are people like me - high on life - that also never seem to get enough.
    My body does not tell me when to rest - my wife does!
     
  2. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    If you're trying to build endurance, it helps to push yourself past the tired point - not so much that you resort to excess pressure and hurt your lip, but enough to push the envelope. If you don't, and have to play a lengthy gig, you'll hit the wall early and have to suffer through the rest of the gig. If you're playing an exposed or essential part and this happens, the only answer is the octave key ;-) , and your lip will be really sore the next day, maybe so much that you can't play.
     
  3. tom turner

    tom turner Mezzo Forte User

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    Wow, a revival of a 3+ year old thread but . . .

    The really strange thing about this revival is this . . . the original poster, jamesfromphilly, died late that year.

    It was a little strange seeing James' name on a thread again.

    T.
     
  4. mike ansberry

    mike ansberry Forte User

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    Lots of good info here. Personally, I think that there is a little wiggle room here. You don't want to beat your chops into the ground. I'm an expert at that. But you do want to build up "road chops" as MPM said. (good to see you on line, Mike) MPM is a killer lead player who spent some time working with Caruso. In college we referred to him as "the clam", not because he missed notes, but because he could bite a piece of steel in two with his embouchure. I guess what it comes down to, in my mind, is that you want to fatigue your embouchure enough to build up the muscles, but not so much that you damage them. It can be a dance on a knife edge.
     
  5. Miyot

    Miyot Pianissimo User

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    I look at it like weight lifting. If you are new to playing the trumpet, your recovery time will take longer. However growth, as in range and endurance will improve rapidly with just a little work. But as you progress it takes more and more hard work, or stress on the chops to induce growth. But your recovery time improves. If you learn to listen to your body, growth should be fairly steady. To much work and not enough rest and progress suffers or even regresses. Not enough work and progress slows, or even stops. It's getting it just right that is really difficult. Listen to your body, often for a beginner your body screams for rest but your desire to advance makes you deaf. Eat good, get plenty of rest, and work smart.
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Are we talking about the same trumpet playing that I have become accustomed to? The eat good applies................
     
  7. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Is that a suggestion to amend that to "get plenty of work" and "rest smart?"
     
  8. Miyot

    Miyot Pianissimo User

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    Yes we are talking about the same playing you have been accustomed to.
    There, I run rings around ya logically. Just my kind of humor. I would insert a smiley face but I don't know how. I am from WV. Can you tell?
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2007
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    wer rastet, rostet! (he who rests, rusts)
     
  10. skankin'dan

    skankin'dan Pianissimo User

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    I keep going until I can't hold a proper embrochure position. But when I play at live show's I tend to change it when im tired. Not good, but on stage, what choice do u have?:dontknow:
     

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