Stretched valve cap threads, can this be fixed?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Repair and Modification' started by duderubble, Jan 28, 2013.

  1. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    NOW you're thinking - learning is painful isn't't? Relax - we've all done something stupid - please include your son in the journey, it's his experience too.
     
  2. duderubble

    duderubble Piano User

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    Oct 21, 2011
    I thought everyone would be happy to know that we got it fixed, good as new. $45 though, ouch. The best part was, my wife was going to Springfield so she got the scolding from the tech.
     
  3. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Happy Valentine's Day Mrs. duderubble!
     
  4. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Well, at least it wasn't a $100 repair bill like A.N.A. Mendez posted earlier...:lol:
     
  5. mush-mouth

    mush-mouth Pianissimo User

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    Haha, dude, that's just not right! :-) Nice to hear about the horn though.
     
  6. Sharvey

    Sharvey Pianissimo User

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    I love this story. Don't feel bad I'm sure there are many of us on this forum who have done worse. My nearest tech is 5 hours away. I have attempted some very repairs over the years that have not only made the problem worse but created additional problems.
    Perhaps this would be a good time for others to indulge in some therapy and fess up to their own stuff ups.

    One time, while cleaning a tuba a valve rolled off my work bench, which is 41/2 feet high and bounced onto the cement floor. I panicked when I saw the valve falling and made a grab for the valve. In the process I bumped a hammer that was hanging up bad it fell on the valve casing creating a dent. I was too embarrassed to own up to this botched cleaning job and tried to repair the damage myself. My repairs were worse than the original fiasco. They involved using wet& dry sandpaper, make specif tools out of wood to straighten the valve casing, modifying a piston honing tool and using a lathe. The results were not pretty.
     
  7. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Hell's Bells Sharvey - you don't "repair" things by halves do you? :shock:
     
  8. Sharvey

    Sharvey Pianissimo User

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    I don't repair anything anymore. I send them to an instrument repairer who I have purchased my last 2 horns from. I have admitted defeat and have accepted that my level of enthusiasm to repair an instrument is not matched by level of expertise
     
  9. tjcombo

    tjcombo Forte User

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    I rule a dividing line between my "good" horns and project horns. There are a few things that separate we mortals from real brass techs. The skills, specialist tools and maybe most important, experience and judgement don't come easy.
    I don't molest my good horns, although it can be painful finding a good tech who can do work in a timely fashion. I found a good one last year, but he's quit and I haven't found if and where he's re-surfaced,

    In the meantime, there's a lump of stainless steel bar in my lathe which will become my first set of dent balls.

    Be afraid... be very afraid... :shock:
     
  10. duderubble

    duderubble Piano User

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    Oct 21, 2011
    I think I was deluded by my success with a DOA euphonium I bopught for $30 on ebay. I was able to unstick all four slides and the mouthpiece, replace all the valve springs, caps and felts even managed to reshape a modern spit valve lever for a 1920's horn. Of course I took the dent work and re-soldering the leadpipe to the tech. Here's the crazy thing. Same tech and a butt load of dents and a mangled and loose leadpipe cost less than the threads on the trumpet. The euphonium turned out great.
     

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