Stuck on G above the staff and mouthpiece

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trompi, Aug 22, 2005.

  1. trompi

    trompi New Friend

    8
    0
    Aug 20, 2005
    SP
    Hi all,

    I'm a self-tought trumpeter (I'm over 30). I've been learning to play almost for a year using common methods and good web information.

    At present time I can reach a solid G over staff but notes over that G sounds forced and weak (I can reach up to E in the third additional line).

    My range has grown quickly in my first year playing but I've been stuck on G since three months.

    I play a Bach 7C mouthpiece. I know I've to practica a lot to enhance my range but I want to know if it's time to change my mouthpiece. Any hint?.

    THANKS A LOT! :-)
     
  2. trumpet blower88

    trumpet blower88 Mezzo Piano User

    Age:
    29
    640
    3
    Jun 15, 2005
    Flagstaff, AZ
    Now, I'm just a student, so I don't know if I would listen to me if I were you, but in my experiance you should probbably think about a 3C, or maybe even a 1 1/2 C. Most students switch to a 3C during their freshman/sophmore year of highschool, and that is with about 3 or 4 years of playing. Even though you've only played for a year, your range seems to be about the same as a student whos been playing for a few years (if not better). I took it by small steps, I started on a 7C, after a couple years whent to a 5C, a couple more years passed and I went to a 3C, a couple more years passed and I moved to a 1 1/2C, and now my senior year I'm playing on a 1C.

    It's really up to you if you want to change mouthpieces or anything, but in my opinion it sounds like you're strong enough to take a step up to a shalower mouthpiece, i.e. a 3C or 1.5C. But also remember, a new mouthpiece wont neccicarily help you with your range, there's lots of differant details that make somethings a bit easier, and some things a bit tougher. One example with the change from a 7C to a 3C is the depth of the cup. A shallower cup will make it easier to hit the higher notes, but at the same time it will make it more difficult to "control" the higher notes and keep them in tune and whatnot. But remember, range isn't everything, a new mouthpiece will affect your tone, intonation, dynamics, articulation, and just about everything.

    With all that said, changeing from a 7C to a 3C isn't too much of a differance, but just remember with a shallower cup it's going to take more strengh in those tiny muscles in your lips to center in on the pitch and keep a good constant tone.
     
  3. dizforprez

    dizforprez Forte User

    1,097
    1
    Nov 2, 2003
    I would highly recommend that you find a pro player in your area so you can get some lessons.
     
  4. trompi

    trompi New Friend

    8
    0
    Aug 20, 2005
    SP
    Thanks for your replies

    I'll try to contact players around my area to learn from them. While I'll try 3C and 1 1/2C mouthpieces.

    Thanks a lot! :-)
     
  5. Billy B

    Billy B Pianissimo User

    212
    1
    Nov 5, 2004
    Des Moines, IA
    There is nothing wrong with your mouthpiece. Don't get caught up in the equipment search. Learning to play trumpet on your own is a hit or miss situation. Getting internet advice makes it even more precarious. Get with a good teacher now before the bad habits become too deeply set. Find a teacher who turns out players.
     
  6. Chris4

    Chris4 Pianissimo User

    101
    0
    Jul 16, 2005
    I agree. If you find a mpc. that works for you, stick with it,your lips aren't growing. As for the G:High note development is the result of months and years of practice. I generally tell my students to develop everything else in their playing and the range will come along as a side effect of all the other work you have done. Look at Wayne Bergeron and his fabulous range. He works on classical technical exercises every day. You will not find him doing anything to only develop his range. The range is simple result of the amazing amount of daily playing that he does, not to mention simple natural ability. No matter what you do, not everyone was created equal when it comes to range or tone. You can work to get better, but some people are just gifted when it comes to the upper register.
     
  7. trompi

    trompi New Friend

    8
    0
    Aug 20, 2005
    SP
    Your comments takes me to another question: ¿What's a reasonable range to all-around playing?, ¿high C?, ¿high G?, ¿double C?. I mean average top note.

    Thanks.
     
  8. Chris4

    Chris4 Pianissimo User

    101
    0
    Jul 16, 2005
    For a decent pro trumpet player I'd say they would have to be able to play to a High G. It all depends on the style of music they play: for jazz-High G at least, for classial/orchestral-High G. This is how high they play with a good tone,however, they may be able to play higher but should be able to play at least that high with a good tone. This is just my experience,however, and I'm sure there are others who can't play as high as the average pro and succeed. The main thing to worry about is tone. Work on that and the high notes will come and you'll do fine.
     
  9. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,791
    3,555
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    Wayne Bergeron is probably a bad example to use - the guy NEVER had range problems. He was blowing above G (4th ledger above the staff) before he was out of junior high.

    I doubt if your range difficulties are being caused by your mouthpiece. Furthermore, I want to address some things posted by Trumpet Blower 88:
    When I was in high school, the common belief was that as you advanced as a player, then as a natural progression you should switch to bigger or different mouthpieces. This was especially true of the kids more focused on "legit" playing. (concert band, orchestra)

    Why?

    In retrospect the single biggest thing that I did to hurt my playing in high school was switch mouthpieces, which I did as a sophomore. I was playing just fine on my Bach 7C, but somewhere I got the bad idea that I needed something different, that it would somehow improve my playing. I spent a several months acclimating to a mouthpiece that I didn't need to switch to, mainly because at the time I had under-developed chops, and had no real clue to things that would help the acclimation process.

    And it didn't help my playing. If anything, I had less range, my sound wasn't as big, and for a while, I had some nasty endurance problems, no doubt caused by my trying to strong arm my chops into submission to force fit a mouthpiece that I shouldn't have switched to.

    Now that I have spent about a half a page blathering about how I don't think you need to change your mouthpiece, I'm going to reiterate the best piece of advice you have already been given in this thread:

    Get a good teacher

    if you have chops issues, if the teacher is worth his or her salt, they can turn you onto some good exercises that will help you to naturally overcome some of those limitations with time, patience, and practice, and you won't spend any more time fumbling around in the dark trying to figure out things on your own. The money spent will be well worth the time and effort you will save. They may even switch your mouthpiece, but if they do, it will be a switch founded on years of experience, and not because of some unfounded belief that you need to switch mouthpieces as a natural progression of improving as a player.

    This is just my opinion of course.
     
  10. trompi

    trompi New Friend

    8
    0
    Aug 20, 2005
    SP
    I take note of all your advice ;-)

    This forum is really friendly, dynamic and helpful.

    Thanks a lot.
     

Share This Page