stuck valve tool

Discussion in 'Trumpet Repair and Modification' started by Sanderson Man, Sep 6, 2009.

  1. Sanderson Man

    Sanderson Man Pianissimo User

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    May 16, 2009
    Whenever I go to get sticking valves un-stuck at the repair shop I watch the guy stand there a a vice with a small tool in it that he uses to smoothen out the dent in my valve.

    What kind of tool is this and where can i get one. It would save me a lot of money and time
     
  2. Solar Bell

    Solar Bell Moderator Staff Member

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    You have to do this frequently?

    If so there is a bigger problem....
     
  3. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    Toronto
    There are a few different kinds of tools you can use to repair valves. It depends on what the issue is.

    I will not recommend any of them to you. Valve repair is something that isn't done by experimentation. You will ruin your trumpet if you don't know what you are doing.
     
  4. Sanderson Man

    Sanderson Man Pianissimo User

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    May 16, 2009
    1. It dosent happen verry often, but in the fall it may become slightly dented once or twice, my hopes are that it would save me some money.

    2.I'm not looking for anything like a valve lapper, just something to keep the valves working solidly during the fall, and I'm definitely not trying to experiment.
    I'm looking for something that is proven to work with damaging the horn itself
     
  5. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    Toronto
    You should treat your horns nicer. I can't remember the last time I have dented a horn.

    I can't give you something that is proven to work because valves have many issues that can occur such as
    Dents in the casing
    warped pistons
    warped casings
    missaligned valve slides causing the casing to bind
    damaged knuckles
    burs
    dirt
    dents in the piston

    There is no miracle tool. Experienced technicians can properly diagnose these issues and fix them without causing other problems.
     
  6. mike ansberry

    mike ansberry Forte User

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    Clarksville, Tennessee, U
    It depends. Is he taking the dent out of the valve casing, or straightening the valve. A tight fitting mandrel would be used to take a dent out of the casing. They make a steel sleeve that is used to straighten the valve itself. I've never used one of those, I can tell by the feel of the way the valve goes into the casing.

    In any case, neither one of these repairs is anything you should do yourself.
     
  7. lmf

    lmf Forte User

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    Indiana USA
    How you getting those valve dents?
     
  8. Sanderson Man

    Sanderson Man Pianissimo User

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    May 16, 2009
    dents in the valve casing. I think he uses the mandrel that you talked about.
     
  9. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    Vidin, Bulgaria
    I think just as SB that most of us get rarely dents on the valve casing and even less can anticipate such accidents. In nearly 20 years playing experience I never had a damaged valves casing - I had bell and slide dents and scratches, stuck valves and slides, broken springs and water keys...Bottom line, IT IS NOT NORMAL TO ANTICIPATE VALVE CASING DAMAGE. Something must be basically wrong with your attitude to your instruments and their maintenance.
     
  10. Sanderson Man

    Sanderson Man Pianissimo User

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    May 16, 2009
    I'm not talking a bout noticeable dents. I'm talking about the almost microscopic ones that cause valve to catch on the way back up. On another note, I take my horns to a lot more places and do a lot more with them that the average player. I'm in three different ensembles in three different places which means my horns travel A LOT. At one time I was in my church ensemble, school wind ensemble, marching band, and scout troop bugler, with the trumpet in the four major elements of my life all at ones, things like this are more likely to happen. I also don't have a car which means horns travel on my lap on buses, or sometimes above me on a rack. Bottom line, My horn get put in situations more than the average high schooler (from what I can deduce), which simply make my horns more vulnerable.
     

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