Studying

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by DanzilF, Sep 26, 2007.

  1. Ichierzen

    Ichierzen Pianissimo User

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    Sep 22, 2007
    I'll second staying away from the megatones for a while, if not a few years or more....

    I got a new megatone earlier this summer, after nearly ten years of playing a standard 3C (granted I didn't play the same mp size all those years), I moved to a 3C Megatone, and I could barely play the horn - it was SO hard I almost took it back and got my money back (something around $50, I believe), that and I made the mistake of also adding the weighted trim kit, so I couldn't blow through it at all - avoid that for a while too. One of my peers here at the college also tried a megatone and hated it because he couldn't get it to sound. He's the same age as me, so I suspect he's been playing the same amount of time.

    I personally view the megatones as a crutch to keep you from focusing on getting a better sound, though it will take from your endurance and range since your lips have to work harder with the added mass - moving back to the regular size will increase both to what they would be otherwise; so maybe tool is a better word than crutch.

    A few days of sticking to it though, and switching back and forth from the standard to the mega I got used to it, and now I love it.

    But yeah, if you're already having troubles, avoiding anything that'll make it harder on you.
     
  2. DanzilF

    DanzilF New Friend

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    Sep 23, 2007
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    Thanks guys. Haven't got the new mouthpiece yet, don't have a car. Does it make snese to test a mp at the shop? Do you notice the difference or do you have to practice for a long time to notice the difference? If yes, how do you test a mp at the shop?

    Sorry for these dump questions :p
     
  3. valejazz

    valejazz New Friend

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    Dec 11, 2005
    Roma - Italia
    Yes but remember to test it not under embouchure fatigue and do not follow first impression without returning to the shop and testing again.

    Test it with standard warm up and study material you know well and play daily.

    Do not test too many mps each time you go to the shop. Have yours for comparison.
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Jun 18, 2006
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    Danzil,
    the mouthpiece has NOTHING to do with what you are going through. It wasn't your problem with the 7E either.
    Of course we can throw hardware (or money) at any problem, and something will change - how often does it get better though?
    Air leaking is 100% an embouchure issue. The only think that you need to change is your practice habits. You need some execizes that strengthen the lips. Eric Bolvin has documented a "pencil" exercize that doesn't even need the horn. You can do this in the car. We are talking about max 5 min per day.
    You NEVER change mouthpieces to fix embouchure problems. The Dennis Wick or Bach mouthpieces are more than good enough when you are building. Once you have some proficency, you can better determine what works. Before that, you are just confusing your face by changing the geometry. Stick with what you have for a while. Solve your problem and do not create new!
     
  5. valejazz

    valejazz New Friend

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    Dec 11, 2005
    Roma - Italia
    Of course too many times we change hardware instead of improving software...

    I completely agree, but...if I were to make a "software" upgrade with a very bad hardware...my effort would be seriously affected if not spoiled..

    So if I have very big lips and use too small a mp...How could I solve efficiently my air leakage problem?
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
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    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    Valerio,
    there is no correlation between lip size and mouthpiece. There are enough lead players with fat lips and small mouthpieces as well as thin lipped orchestral players with big mouthpieces. This has been discussed at great length in Wilmers forum.
    Our lips are compressed while playing anyway and therefore have a different, more compact "shape".
    Both the Wick 4E and Bach 7E have "medium" sized rims and are suitable for a wide range of players.
     

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