Sunken Conn trumpet from WWII wreckage at Smithsonian - which model?

Discussion in 'Vintage Trumpets / Cornets' started by Furcifer, Feb 17, 2016.

  1. Furcifer

    Furcifer Pianissimo User

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  2. BrassBandMajor

    BrassBandMajor Fortissimo User

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    ITS A CONN horn, I am sure about that. Connstellation looks.... but not a Connstellation.
     
  3. Vintge Cornet Guy

    Vintge Cornet Guy Pianissimo User

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    Conn 2B with first slide stop rod
    Conn Loyalist - 2B New World Symphony

    or a Conn 8B with first slide stop rod
    http://cderksen.home.xs4all.nl/Conn8B1936image.html

    Conn Loyalist says that the Conn 2B was discontinued after 1932,
    and the Conn 8B was started in 1932.
    But such dates tend to be approximate rather than written in stone.
    And the OP article says around 1934 as though that is not carved in stone either, such as because of serial number that is so corroded that it is hard to read.

    The real test is if the solder from third slide finger ring is on top of the slide per 2B or on bottom of the slide per 8B.

    The fasteners on the first slide stop rod look more like the ones on the 8B than the 2B (straight straps rather than ovals),
    and although I see solder from the third slide stop rod on top of the third slide
    I don't see any finger ring solder behind it on top of the slide.
    So, combined with alleged 1934 date, slightly greater chance that it is an 8B, although one should not claim to be sure from just that one photo.
     
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  4. Furcifer

    Furcifer Pianissimo User

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    Yeah, I'm inclined to go with the 8B just because of the position of the main brace on the body of the horn rather than on the slide itself. The article does mentions pearl buttons, which is present on the 2B, but may or may not be on the 8B. The article also refers, perhaps inaccurately, to the trumpet's "brass and steel" body. I don't know if there was steel in the bracing back then or if maybe they are referring to the bell wire, or "Crysteel valves" - which I have no idea whether they were steel at all - or the bell made of "specially-processed metal called C-17", which I don't think anybody has ever cut up a horn to do a spectrographic analysis of, either, LOL!
     
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  5. Dennis78

    Dennis78 Fortissimo User

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    I think this has been posted once before
     
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  6. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    I remember three threads about it...
     
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  7. Brassman64

    Brassman64 Mezzo Forte User

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  8. Franklin D

    Franklin D Forte User

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    Prewar Ganschhorn
     
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  9. Brassman64

    Brassman64 Mezzo Forte User

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    I agree it must be an 8b.Here is some background on the USS Houston and how she was lost.https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Houston_(CA-30) https://www.stripes.com/news/purloined-trumpet-tells-story-of-life-on-uss-houston-1.288864
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2018

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