Swelling of lips and tongue...brass allergy?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by austexcal, Oct 3, 2009.

  1. MTROSTER

    MTROSTER Piano User

    424
    24
    Jan 25, 2007
    Canada
    Nickel causes allergies in everyone.;-)


    Dr. MIke
     
  2. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

    8,221
    7,627
    Jul 20, 2006
    Heart of Dixie
    Many types of stainless steel have small amounts of nickel in their makeup. Don't know if it's enough to trigger an allergic reaction, though.
     
  3. austexcal

    austexcal New Friend

    7
    0
    Oct 3, 2009
    Update II,

    After consulting with his trumpet teacher, band instructor and doctor, we got the gold-plated mouthpiece. He likes it and even says it has a "softer" feel. I would guess that you who play would know what that means.

    Doctor did say the nickel allergies (nickel is in the silver alloy by the way) is very common. He sees it mostly in women who wear silver jewelry, but does see musicians occasionally.

    Austexcal
     
  4. austexcal

    austexcal New Friend

    7
    0
    Oct 3, 2009
    Update III,

    Apparently, nickel can leach through gold plating, the swollen lips happened again. He's playing plastic until results from testing are in. Suspect we'll need to go titanium which is kind of pricey.

    He'd been looking at a Wedge before, but they don't do titanium, though they offered to modify an existing titanium. Not sure about that.

    :-?
     
  5. RAK

    RAK Piano User

    388
    2
    Jul 23, 2009
    Kettle Falls, Washington
  6. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

    3,139
    1,603
    Jan 9, 2010
    East Yorkshire
    I wonder (Pondering thinking noise) In the EU we have a directive for jewellery (European Community Nickle Directive ECND) Which states that no piece of jewellery made from base or plated metals can leach more than a minute amount of nickle. They are considered Hypo-allergenic. I have sold ear rings made from the new plateing to people who cannot wear gold and they have been happy with them I wonder if anyone has jumped on the technique for mouthpieces. Hint to all those mouthpiece manufacturers out there

    Cheers All

    Andrew
     
  7. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

    8,040
    2,035
    Aug 16, 2009
    Jackson NC
    The Wedge is available in surgical grade stainless steel as made by Dr. Dave Harrelson, M.D. in Vancouver B.C. ! Yes, it is fifty Canadian dollars more expensive than silverplated brass. Communicate with him! Http://wedgemouthpieces.com Too, such stainless steel can additionally be infused with titanium by Houser Mouthpieces, but I know of no one that machines titanium mouthpieces.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2010
  8. hup_d_dup

    hup_d_dup Piano User

    339
    28
    May 28, 2009
    Tewksbury, NJ, USA
    Titanium is a generic term used for dozens of different alloys, a number of which contain nickel.
     
  9. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

    8,040
    2,035
    Aug 16, 2009
    Jackson NC
    You stuck your foot in your mouth and failed the chemistry course. Titanium is a pure element Ti with atomic weight of 22. Full discourse follows:
    Titanium (pronounced /taɪˈteɪniəm/, tye-TAY-nee-əm) is a chemical element with the symbol Ti and atomic number 22. Sometimes called the “space age metal”, it has a low density and is a strong, lustrous, corrosion-resistant (including sea water, aqua regia and chlorine) transition metal with a silver color.
    Titanium can be alloyed with iron, aluminium, vanadium, molybdenum, among other elements, to produce strong lightweight alloys for aerospace (jet engines, missiles, and spacecraft), military, industrial process (chemicals and petro-chemicals, desalination plants, pulp, and paper), automotive, agri-food, medical prostheses, orthopedic implants, dental and endodontic instruments and files, dental implants, sporting goods, jewelry, mobile phones, and other applications.[2] Titanium was discovered in England by William Gregor in 1791 and named by Martin Heinrich Klaproth for the Titans of Greek mythology.
    The element occurs within a number of mineral deposits, principally rutile and ilmenite, which are widely distributed in the Earth's crust and lithosphere, and it is found in almost all living things, rocks, water bodies, and soils.[2] The metal is extracted from its principal mineral ores via the Kroll process[3] or the Hunter process. Its most common compound, titanium dioxide, is used in the manufacture of white pigments.[4] Other compounds include titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4), a component of smoke screens and catalysts; and titanium trichloride (TiCl3), which is used as a catalyst in the production of polypropylene).[2]

    For the OP do note the medical uses.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2010
  10. hup_d_dup

    hup_d_dup Piano User

    339
    28
    May 28, 2009
    Tewksbury, NJ, USA
    Ed, don't you think there is a better way to respond to someone you disagree with than such a nasty remark? This is how threads descend into useless bickering. Please, attack the argument, not the person.

    The titanium used in airplanes, bicycles and very likely mouthpieces is titanium alloy. Generally lay conversations such as this one are referring to titanium alloys, NOT elemental titanium. Check this link to see dozens of titanium alloys: Titanium alloy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    If you can show that mouthpieces are made of elemental titanium I will humbly stand corrected.
     

Share This Page