Switching bores

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Mambo King, Oct 21, 2010.

  1. Mambo King

    Mambo King Pianissimo User

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    Aug 20, 2009
    London
    For the last couple of weeks I've been practising on my Stomvi Mambo which is an extra large bore but did a big band rehearsal on my Olds Recording on Monday and played like a drain. I'm a comeback player of 15 months and have a good routine which I vary enough so that it doesn't become too routine but this is the first time that I've had such an off night. My first thought was that it was nothing more than an off night but what is the perceived wisdom about spending time with one bore the playing either in rehearsal or on a gig on another (smaller, in this case) bore? My symptoms were lack of stamina and range (without ramming the horn onto my face and resorting to the "no technique pressure" method). Any comments or advice would be welcomed. I'm not too worried at this stage but at the same time I'm open to more enlightened advice !

    Cheers
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    It has NOTHING to do with the bore. It most likely has more to do with how well you hear yourself. The Mambo is a bright, splashy sounding horn and a lot of the sound gets back to the player (and therefore a bit less to the audience). The Olds is a completely different type of horn. The sound is more directed at the audience and less gets back to the player. I think your brain was trying to get the Stomvi sound out of the Olds. The price paid is now clear to you. Practice with the Olds more and you will get along with it just fine.
     
  3. Mambo King

    Mambo King Pianissimo User

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    Aug 20, 2009
    London
    Yep, I see what you are driving at. I normally get on fine with the Recording so other than spending more time with it when I have a gig or rehearsal coming up, I don't think I'll lose any sleep. Thanks for the clear advice.
     
  4. edfitzvb

    edfitzvb Forte User

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    I have had the same experience going from one horn to another. If I am not careful I will do the same thing going from a rehearsal space (live, a classroom portable because everybody at home is tired of hearing me practice and i don't like practice mutes) and a performance space like church where i don't get the feedback. If i'm not careful i will end up overblowing looking for the sound I get rehearsing and everything goes to pot. I noticed the same thing when I went from a .470 to a .460 bore horn. I worked harder trying to recreate the sound.
     
  5. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Rowuk hits it on the head. One projects better and you don't hear yourself.

    I have always thought it interesting that, while my Olds Recording is a fabulous horn, producing a big, thick sound, it wears me out to play it. Literally. For some reason, I feel I have to work harder on it than on my other horns. Of course, it reciprocates and gives a sound that is better than the others. For that reason, I don't use it if I have to play for an extended amount of time. (I now only play for fun and am not in the best playing shape.)
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The trick to heavier horns is to train the ears to accept less feedback. We need to "listen" to the room more. Then we do not wear ourselves out as quickly.
     
  7. jim trpt1

    jim trpt1 Pianissimo User

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    Aug 7, 2010
    greensboro nc
    I have comeback after years of lay off, I wish I was 15 months into it, but sadly only three. I practice mostly on large bore horns, then on performance days or band practice I switch to My Bobby Shew 6130z. The 6130z usually projects well and iI can hear it in an ensemble enviroment, well, last week I couldn't hear a thing I was playing at practice,and physically it felt like doo doo. i can tell if im ponding it just by the response of the vibration of my horn in my hand, really does not matter what horn I am playing. Trumpet playing is a funny thing, sometime you just don't have it no matter what horn you are playing.
     

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