Switching major instruments

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Shoe, Feb 3, 2016.

  1. Shoe

    Shoe Pianissimo User

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    Thanks!
    I wasn't sure about staying on the 3c, but you guys reassured me.
    I mean, horn has a wonderful sound and all, I just get bored of the lack of fun parts/rep/competition.
    And trumpet is just more fun.
    Brassbandmajor, I don't want to do both because I want ti be really good. I cant be really good splitting my pratice time between two instruments.
     
  2. Shoe

    Shoe Pianissimo User

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    If it helps, I played on a stork frw custom horn mp, extra deep and wide, so the mouthpiece size diffrence isn't as big as it could be.
     
  3. LaTrompeta

    LaTrompeta Forte User

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    Wait, you mean playing melodies is more fun than playing off beats? :shock: It's true that you should pick one instrument as your primary. But there are some killer multi-instrumentalists out there. Look up James Morrison (jazz player).
     
  4. fels

    fels Piano User

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    I play trumpet - and piano -- mostly trumpet currently --- BUT - i suggest you think of your IDENTITY as a musician -- then follow your preference for expression!
     
  5. LaTrompeta

    LaTrompeta Forte User

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    True. If I lost my lips or something, I'd go with another instrument. It's the music that's inside me that needs to come out!
     
  6. BrassBandMajor

    BrassBandMajor Fortissimo User

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    Ok, I play quite a few on quite reasonable high standards, Cello, clarinet, trumpet and french horn.
    Shoe, I am telling you don't leave your Yamaha collecting dust, give a few blows a week.
    You're gonna regret putting the horn down forever. Just a few blows than you can have both instruments at steady pace.
     
  7. BrassBandMajor

    BrassBandMajor Fortissimo User

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    I was able talk to the man himself and touch his trumpet :D and see his superbone!
    Great and nice motivational player. Amazing range, amazing playing skills on all instruments he plays!
     
  8. amzi

    amzi Forte User

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    My opinion--play one or the other, pick the one you truly love. If you're comfortable with your horn mouthpiece you might try a Bach 7C or even a Bach 10 1/2 C--I certainly wouldn't suggest anything smaller. But your 3C will also work if you don't want to change. Once you get the trumpet nailed down you can recapture that magnificent mellowness you love in the horn you can add the flugelhorn. A small bore flugelhorn with a big bell (especially in copper) can get a very horn like sound with the right mouthpiece (very deep very funnel shaped, just like a horn mouthpiece). You should also avail yourself of a few trumpet lessons. It will help you make the necessary changes to your embouchure and your overall approach to playing. Above all, remember to have fun.
     
  9. J. Jericho

    J. Jericho Fortissimo User

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    I played alto horn during my first year as a brass player. My band director wanted me to develop my chops for french horn on this instrument first. Over the Summer, while acclimating to the French horn, I just could not generate enthusiasm for the sound of the instrument. I had wanted to play trumpet from the beginning, but the director had more than enough of them, which is why he put me on alto/French horn in the first place. I switched to trumpet anyway, much to his displeasure. Despite my developed ability, he put me at the bottom of the trumpet section. We had a challenge system by which if you thought you could play better then the next guy, you could challenge him. A contest of playing was arranged, and the band voted on who was better. I initiated a lot of challenges and didn't stay at the bottom for long.

    But I digress. As you can see in my signature, I play trombone also, and I have no difficulty switching between the two. I also played flute for awhile, and it was quite easy. I would still play one today, but I have trouble fitting more than 24 hours into each day. I would say that you can play as many instruments as you please. There are differences among embouchures, but so what? One will not hinder another, at least in my experience and opinion. More trumpet players use a Bach 3C or one of its many variants than any other mouthpiece, with great success. If it fits your mouth structure, use it for your trumpet playing, and enjoy making music with whatever other instruments you like.
     
  10. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    For me it's drums, and I enjoy being a drummer to the point that if something happened and I could no longer play trumpet, or my gig opportunities for trumpet dried up, or if I just got tired of trying to maintain trumpet chops (for me it has gotten harder the older I get) then I'll hang up the horn and put all of my efforts in on the drum kit.

    Looking at your situation, as I see it, there are some practical reasons to switch, which have nothing to do with the fact that you clearly have a passion for playing trumpet.

    1. To me, it's always seemed that trumpet is more interesting to play in a concert band setting - more melody lines, and we're the ones who get to play the glory notes - the high, loud, brilliant stuff.
    2. Gig opportunities - a solid trumpet player can make bank on the Christmas and Easter holidays, but aside from that, a trumpet player can also do Latin band, Ska band, rock band, big band, etc. We're also called on to be buglers for "Taps." Horn players don't do that. (I didn't realize how lucky we've got it for gig opportunities until I was chatting with one of the trombone players from the quartet I'm gigging with on Easter, and she mentioned how much more in demand trumpet is than trombone - the same would hold true for horn.)
    3. Instruments are less expensive - by and large, getting behind a pro-level trumpet is going to be quite a bit less than getting behind a pro-level horn.

    To me, I see switching to trumpet as a win/win in a lot of regards, which is beside the point that you are more drawn to it. Given the choice, I'd rather play trumpet over horn any day of the week - I have zero desire to ever be a horn player.
     

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