Switching Mouthpieces

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trumpetaddict, May 12, 2011.

  1. trumpetaddict

    trumpetaddict New Friend

    41
    0
    Sep 3, 2010
    Is it bad to constantly switch mouthpieces? Right now im experimenting with my Bach 3C,7C and my Schilke 15C4 to see which one gives me the best results. :dontknow:
     
  2. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,127
    9,302
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    No, not if you go through the process quickly, find the one that feel best for you should take no longer than a week or two. But once you find the piece, stick with it for the long run. You may go back and forth to play a tune or two with other pieces, but stick to one piece to perform on for the bulk of a practice session.
     
  3. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

    3,936
    1,830
    Jan 21, 2010
    Great Southern Land
    Before I got addicted to my Monette, I played two Wedges with differing depths but similar rims. That was far easier than switching between, say, my old Denis Wick 2 and Bach 3C pieces (very different rims).

    I seem to remember reading that Adam Rapa plays regularly on a selection of mouthpieces, and also those of us who play cornet or flugelhorn as well as trumpet probably need to accommodate more than one mouthpiece.

    --bumblebee
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,616
    7,960
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    Mouthpiece choice is not "life or death". We must clearly separate those who practice enough (who can get away with everything) and those that don't who should concentrate on what is important (like practicing more).

    I find comparing mouthpieces useless. My take is that it takes the face too long to get used to them. My students get a mouthpiece for a couple of weeks/months and then we talk about the difference. If there is a change in sound, comfort, playing characteristics, we take notes and then move to the next mouthpiece if need be.
     
  5. richtom

    richtom Forte User

    Age:
    67
    1,538
    1,273
    Dec 7, 2003
    As is usual, Rowuk is right on the money. It may take an experienced pro a few minutes of play time to determine if a different mouthpiece is suitable, but for most players, especially novice or intermediate ones, you should NOT keep jumping from one mouthpiece to another. It takes weeks or months for this level of players face to adjust to a mouthpiece.
    Find the one that feels comfortable and allows for the best sound and response and put the others out of easy reach. Then practice.
    I am a GR dealer. (Not yet a consultant). I've had players of all levels come to me for trials and more than a few of them have kept their original mouthpiece. Why did they?
    The mouthpiece was the "right" one for their embouchure and worked well in their instrument. The player, mouthpiece, and horn must work as one. If one of those points is not right, all you get is chaos and for a novice, comeback, or intermediate player that means problems in your performance and any advancement. Fooling around with different mouthpieces without in person assistance of someone who really can help you will only aggravate any issues you already may have.
    Rich T.
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,127
    9,302
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    I do not disagree with rowuk, which is why I recommend the majority of the time 80%, there is a consistent mouth piece that should be used when practicing. Again, the mouth muscles will be adapted by the use, and therefore most consistency is acquired through the use of a particular mouthpiece.
    But when I play in the upper range, even though my principal piece is a Schilke 14A4a, I switch to my Jettone Studio B. I use this piece probably on less than 10% of songs. I could do the work on my Schilke, but the Jettone does require less effort and therefore increases my endurance.
    I play my flugel on 30-40% of songs and that requires a different mouthpiece. So it's hard to avoid switching mouthpieces based on my performance needs. Still in all, the control I have achieved is consistent with all of these switches.
     
  7. SwingPlayer

    SwingPlayer New Friend

    16
    0
    Apr 7, 2011
    I.E. SoCal
    I switch based on the music I'm playing
     
  8. BrotherBACH

    BrotherBACH Piano User

    403
    144
    Oct 5, 2010
    Not trying to highjack a thread. But, the question that arises. Is it possible that a wrong size mouthpiece promotes bad playing habits? If you use the right size mouthpiece for you, it will facilitate good playing habits. What I mean by playing habits it how you use your embrochure. The trouble then is how do you know what is the right size for you. Hopefully a teacher will help guide you like Rowuk does with his students.

    BrotherBACH
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,616
    7,960
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    The mouthpiece is secondary. Bad playing habits could be influenced by an extreme mismatch(1X for a lead player), but even only minimal common sense can prevent that. My students can play their lessons on my Monette B2D, the 7C that came with their horns or any of the other pieces in my collection. Doing that on occasion shows them how important sticking with something until you get decent is. Changing mouthpieces only makes sense IF you have the strong, stable base that only lots of practice gives.
     
  10. BrotherBACH

    BrotherBACH Piano User

    403
    144
    Oct 5, 2010
    Thank you. That was helpful.

    BrotherBACH
     

Share This Page