Sympathy for the less fortunate

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by gzent, Jan 7, 2014.

  1. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    New York State USA
    what he said -- except that my "dead hunk of metal" does come to life when I am playing it --- and for that, the trumpet I currently play --- is, in a matter of a word --- PRICELESS
     
  2. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    Rochester, MN
    Here's some information for those who might have an interest in Harrelson trumpets.

    Each model can be ordered with a choice of:
    - 10 different leadpipes
    - 20 different bells
    - 2 different tuning slides
    - 2 different water key styles
    - 2 different receiver styles
    - 3 different trim weights
    - 5 different finish options

    That is 24,000 unique possibilities, and that is not including custom options like bracing or artwork or hundreds
    of possible finger button choices.

    When someone tells you that their Bravura didn't work for them, consider how little their horn might
    have in common with the horn you might order.
     
  3. afp

    afp Pianissimo User

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    Oct 9, 2013
    Roseburg, OR
    The problem with Harrelson isn't the bell and lead pipe options or the finger buttons and trim kit options. The problem is Jason's ideas on SWE simply do not work for everyone. Specifically, they do not work for me. My Bravura was set up with first a #6 LP with a #3 Bell, then later a I had it changed to a #4 or #1 lead pipe. I played Yamaha, Bach, and Carol Brass trumpets with very similar lead pipe and bell configurations, and the Yamaha, Bach, and Carol Brass horns all played better for me than the Bravura. In fact, it was an inexpensive Carol Brass trumpet set up very similar to the #6 LP/#3 Bell configuration of the Bravura that opened my eyes to all this. I wasn't sharp above the staff with the Carol Horn, and my response and endurance was better as well.

    My issue with Harrelson horns is his SWE concept is the exact opposite way I need to go. I need a lightweight horn and a mouthpiece with a very lightweight back bore. I need trim kits that are much lighter than the lightest Jason makes and conventional bracing. I need a very high feedback large bore horn, the kind of feedback you get with a lightweight LB Bach 72/43, which also played better for me than the Bravura and was the final experience that sent me to a Wild Thing. The core idea behind the Wild Thing is about the exact opposite of Jason's ideas on SWE. For Jason to make a horn to suit me, he would have to get a large bore valve block, a lightweight bell very similar to the WT bell, a lightweight body, ultra lightweight trim kits, and conventional bracing; and that would pretty much throw all his ideas for what makes a horn work out the window.

    That doesn't make either the WT or any of Jason's horns right or wrong universally, just right or wrong for an individual player. The very complaints I had with the Bravura would be a huge benefit to someone else. That person would most likely hate the Wild Thing for the very reason I love it.

    Now I can say from personal experience that Jason makes quality instruments that are assembled with great care. If his ideas work for you then you will get a first rate horn matched to how you play. If his ideas don't work for you, there are lots of other horns out there that will work better for you.
     
  4. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    Rochester, MN
    Why make this about you?
     
  5. afp

    afp Pianissimo User

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    Oct 9, 2013
    Roseburg, OR
    Oh please................... :roll: It's not about me, it's about the fact that there is no one perfect trumpet or mouthpiece for everyone. You have found the perfect horn for you. That is fantastic and you are right to be enthusiastic about it. But understand MOST trumpet players will not have the same experience.
     
  6. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    Rochester, MN
    That's nothing but pure unsubstantiated blather based on one experience, yours.

    There is a reason why Harrelson is the best selling custom made horn on the planet, and its not because all the "oddballs"
    got together and decided to buy Harrelsons. As more people open their minds to the science behind Harrelson trumpets
    they will become more prevalent.

    Not that it proves the goodness of Harrelson horns, but more and more outstanding players are switching to them,
    including our friend Gary (grmonday) and a fellow named Arturo. Apparently only really good players can appreciate
    Harrelson trumpets? If that's your claim, then thank you!
     
  7. afp

    afp Pianissimo User

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    Oct 9, 2013
    Roseburg, OR
    What is so hard about accepting the fact that what works great for some may work poorly for others?

    BTW, I never said only oddballs like Harrelson. I said that Harrelsons ideas don't work for everyone, explained why Jason's science doesn't work for me, and even said my Holy Grail--the Wild Thing--doesn't work for everyone. I don't need others to think that the best choice for me is the best choice for them. I also said Jason makes high quality instruments and that for some people they are perfect.

    The FACT that there are hundreds of styles and configurations of trumpets is ample testimony that it isn't just me--different people like different stuff. That is the way most things in life work as anyone who has lived a while and accomplished a few things knows.

    Be happy that you found your perfect horn. Be happy for me that I found my perfect horn. I promise you this, if you ever played in my trumpet section, you would enjoy me on the Wild Thing and hate me on the Bravura.
     
  8. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    Rochester, MN
    Because I'm not just a musician, but also an engineer, so I have a strong desire to understand how things work, especially trumpets.
    I've spent significant time in the past few years playing around with trumpet mods to see what makes them work better, as well as spending
    time understanding the physics behind trumpets.

    So, it is not logical that a great trumpet can play poorly for some people.

    This would be like saying a Porsche 911 performs poorly for some drivers.
    The only scenario where that is true is if the driver is incompetent.

    So, for me to accept that a great trumpet plays poorly for some players would require that
    those players are incompetent, and it would be hard to think incompetent players are actively participating
    in discussions about high end trumpets here on TM.

    Greg
     
  9. Sterling

    Sterling Mezzo Forte User

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    Oct 22, 2007
    Marcellus, NY
    Love my 1960 Conn 10B Victor and my Bach 43 Sterling Bell and my Olds Recording and my King Silvertone and my Olds Opera and my Boehm and Meinl rotary. I would be bored to death with one a flat horn.
     
  10. Sterling

    Sterling Mezzo Forte User

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    Oct 22, 2007
    Marcellus, NY
    One Bflat horn. Darn spell check!
     

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