Systematic Approach

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Jfrancis, Feb 27, 2011.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    If you play them properly for a year, you will be one big step further. They do not focus on any single aspect, rather on a holistic approach. I can recommend it.
     
  2. pbenn2112

    pbenn2112 New Friend

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    So, it looks like (at least for me) that one of the big issues with this method is the amount of time it takes on a daily basis. Has anyone experimented with taking two days to do each lesson? So, instead of weekly lessons, one would do a new lesson every two weeks? You could do the CG specific material on day one and the supplemental material on day two. I know it would take a lot longer overall (2 years), but wouldn't it still be greatly beneficial?
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Let's not forget that the Claude Gordon method was written for "interested" players - not others looking for a short cut. There is nothing wrong with spending 2 days for each lesson, you just need to keep the time spent daily up.

    There are infinite levels between crap and brilliant. Compromise just keeps you closer to one than the other!
     
  4. Jfrancis

    Jfrancis Pianissimo User

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    yessss!
     
  5. jeff_purtle

    jeff_purtle Pianissimo User

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    Last edited: Mar 2, 2011
  6. hrg96

    hrg96 New Friend

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    It can be, but there are plenty of ways around this. I have been working SA for just over a year. I started back on the horn after a 25 year layoff. I had used it some back in high school and college so I was already familiar with it. I recommend you get the Claude Gordan book "Brass Playing is No Harder than Deep Breathing". It lays out most of what you need to know to use SA. Most SA folks recommend starting on Lesson 2. They also recommend spending two weeks per lesson.

    One key point is that most of the CG teachers will modify the lessons. Around Lesson 6-7 the amount of work can be overwhelming because of the Clarke studies (three at one time and these particular ones are long and strenous). I modified them whenever I need to. If I run out of time I concentrate on the new material adn split up the rest.

    On time management, I break it up over the day. Yes its an hour plus worth of material, but you can do it a little at a time. The amount of material is not even each lesson. Some weeks are really a lot and others are relatively short. Thats why sometimes I will skip something or do half one day with the other half the next day.

    The biggest thing is that this method is very comprehensive. you cover range (high and low), flexibility, multiple tongueing and articulation, and work into etudes. If you read more about it you will find that it is really Herbert Clarke's method as Claude Gordon was one of his students. I hope this helps some, I sent you a PM as well.

    I think this is the best method out there for an experienced player who needs to work on their own. After a year my sound and technique are as good or better than they ever were. Just be sure to take the time to read all of the accompanying text in the Gordon and Clarke books.

    Best Wishes,

    Russ
     
  7. hrg96

    hrg96 New Friend

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    I missed Jeff Purtle's post before mine. Check out the link on his site on the brass playing articles. They do an excellent job of laying out the Gordon method and how to use and understand the material. Jeff is one of the Claude Gordon students who teaches his method. Matt Graves, John Mohan, and Eric Bolvin also can help.

    Home Page

    ::: Eric Bolvin Music Studios - home :::
     
  8. fraserhutch

    fraserhutch Mezzo Piano User

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    For those who do not have the time to run through SA, maybe you can give the Eric Bolvin Tongue Level and Air text.

    I went through the SA method several times in college. It was never really about range - it was about developing power and consistency across the entire instrument. There is ALWAYS the implicit assumption that whatever you can do in one register should be done in all registers. However, Rowuk is absolutely right in that the method is for interested and directed players, and by itself the SA parts are only a small portion of what you're expected to do each day.
     
  9. ebjazz

    ebjazz Pianissimo User

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  10. jongorrie

    jongorrie Pianissimo User

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