Taking a breath

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by fuzzyhaze, Feb 25, 2012.

  1. fuzzyhaze

    fuzzyhaze Mezzo Piano User

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    I have always took a breath through the corners of my mouth. My teacher never said different, so that is what I've always done. I was wondering if it was better to take a breath through my nose, although when I do this it is harder to take a large breath. Anyone out there got advice for me on this? I was thinking that breathing in through my nose disturbs my embouchure less. Thanks.
     
  2. Brad-K

    Brad-K Piano User

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    Even I can confidently say that through the corners of your mouth is the correct, and proper way to breathe.
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The nose is there to filter and warm the air before it goes to the lungs. If there is time, breathing through the nose is preferred.
     
  4. Brad-K

    Brad-K Piano User

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    Wow.
     
  5. fuzzyhaze

    fuzzyhaze Mezzo Piano User

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    Thanks for everyones help. Trying it right now!
     
  6. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    I was taught to never breath through my nose. Always in the corners. I set my embouchure, then I keep my lips set on the mouthpiece but I open the rest of my lips as big as I can and take a big breath. That is what I do when I start, and when I have an 8th rest or a small break I just do a quick "sip" from my mouth. But that is how I was taught and it works great.

    -Cody
     
  7. NotCody

    NotCody Banned

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    I thought that breathing through the nose was the worst thing you can do. Doesnt it give you less air because of the smaller tubes?
     
  8. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    I don't know personally the merits of breathing through the nose, because I have not been trained to do that properly.
    However, I have been taught that singers learn to breathe in through the nose (at least here at UF) for the reasons stated by Rowuk.

    When I breathe through the nose, I feel that I don't get a deep enough breath, but that may be because I am not used to it. This is one reason I choose to breathe through the mouth.
    Also, I have found that breathing through the mouth corners FOR ME helps prepare my embouchure for the coming note. I find a good breath, right before the note helps (from the corners). This may be in my head, but it works for me.

    To answer your question, perhaps there is some training that will assist your nose breathing idea. If you feel you play better doing so, why not? I don't think you need much more of a reason than that.
     
  9. fuzzyhaze

    fuzzyhaze Mezzo Piano User

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    Thanks again for everyone's input!
     
  10. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    It is basically very simple. It depends who we are talking to. For the know-it-all adolescents, they can't imagine anything else. What they do not realize is when someones playing is weak, we do a lot of things to get short term results. Most often the patience is missing to build the right habits first. No band director will take the long way around if there is a chance that the player will get discouraged.

    I will try and explain this so that everyone that wants to can understand.

    Breathing is more than the simple intake of air when we talk about trumpet. With a weak embouchure and little body control, opening the mouth gets us a lot of bang for the buck. The problem is, filling up really fast is a shock for the lungs and it also makes us more susceptible to tension. When we have time, breathing through the nose is MUCH LOWER IMPACT (low tension), we fill up in a more natural way and can release the air in a very smooth way. When we have the mouthpiece on the face and stretch the lips to inhale, we are not doing good things to our embouchure. We have to find the best position again, and if there is a bit too much pressure, that can be a problem.

    In my many years of giving lessons, breathing and tension are the two major things that students need fixed. We do not always need to fill up in the time of an 8th or 16th note. Anticipating the entry, slowly winding up helps us avoid a lot of things that can be in the way.

    If some of you care to try, filling up with the nose lets you get MORE air in. For those of you that have NOT practiced this, do not expect results over night. Like everything else good, it takes time to integrate.


    Just do yourself a favor. Try it for a while. Low impact/high yield is called "efficient" elsewhere.
     

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