Taking a breath

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by fuzzyhaze, Feb 25, 2012.

  1. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    A Kingtrumpet, Mr. college grad... Perhaps a review of the English language is in order at this point:

    flush 1 (flsh)
    v. flushed, flush•ing, flush•es
    v.intr.
    1. To turn red, as from fever, embarrassment, or strong emotion; blush.
    2. To glow, especially with a reddish color: The sky flushed pink at dawn.

    So this just about negates all the advice from your post above. If you get in the right amount of air, we go in this direction, Oh hypoxic one!
     
  2. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    Yes, take a deep BREATH, GM (or should I say -- medicine man???))))you are the master of the English language -- perhaps you can learn how to spell sometime -- and learn that there is more than one adjective in the English language. ROFL ROFL ROFL

    pale1    /peɪl/ Show Spelled [peyl] Show IPA adjective, pal·er, pal·est, verb, paled, pal·ing.
    adjective
    1. lacking intensity of color; colorless or whitish: a pale complexion.
    2. of a low degree of chroma, saturation, or purity; approaching white or gray: pale yellow.
    3. not bright or brilliant; dim: the pale moon.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2012
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Pale? Where did you get that word? Here is what I orignially said:

    "I just had to try the toilet paper method, and I have to admit, I got flushed!" The word I used was flushed, this is the exact opposite of pale. Please do read the post carefully KT.
     
  4. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    And stay away from poker tables! If you don't know the difference between "pale", "flushed", and "royal flushed", you could get flushed bigtime. Just trying to save you some money, KT.


    Turtle
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2012
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Turtle, I commend you on trying to save KT on this point, because we well know, saving Kingtrumpet's reputation, well that is an uphill battle. Kingtrumpet, is truly a legend in his own mind.
     
  6. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Well, I figure if he has a little extra cash from avoiding the pitfalls of poker, he can buy himself a nice crown (befitting a King). :-)


    Turtle
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Better yet, let's you and I crown him ourselves! For Free EVEN!
     
  8. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    the problem is that if I always use your words -- then TM will think we are siamese twins or something, and that would be detrimental to my reputation. I was thinking in medical terms that being "flushed" meant that you became pale, and lost your BREATH, and lost the color in your face -- and that is what I was thinking ----- YOU BECAME PALE which was an indication that you needed to BREATH. ROFL ROFL ROFL
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2012
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  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I truly appreciate your honesty in your misunderstanding of the terms pale versus flush. I want to use your confusion to bring out a point to all reading this post, a teaching moment if you will. The title of this thread is Taking in a Breath.

    Taking in a breath is all about oxygenation (O2). Hemoglobin binds this, and light absorption of the heme protein appears red. As this oxygenated hemoglobin goes to our skin surface, it appears to pinken the skin... this give the physical exam sign of flushing. Much of this inhaled oxygen is absorbed when we take it in (showing our interstitial exchange in our lungs is working), but as trumpet players, we take much of this unabsorbed oxygen (and carbon dioxide that has exchanged in the time we inhaled) and with the majority of gas being nitrogen, blow it back out through our horns. The process if blowing out the horn is a combination of passive and active events all of which we can titrate control, which produces the sound we want WHEN WE ARE IN CONTROL. We have a lot of voluntary muscle that allows this control.

    When we breathe out, we ventilate. Ventilation relates to our ability to expel air. The amount of carbon dioxide we breathe out (CO2) is the BEST measure of ventilatory capacity. If we are not ventilating well, that means our lungs are not moving air well which means we are producing more carbon dioxide than we are taking in oxygen. This causes the physical finding of being pale.

    When we as physicians are responsible for ventilating our unconscious, sedated [and sometimes paralyzed] patients, it is our responsibility to maintaining oxygenation (PaO2 from the arterial blood sample we take or %O2 more crudely (but definitely less painful) from the pulse ox (that "ET call home" device we docs slap on your finger). This is controlled by our ability to deliver various concentrated levels (and delivery systems - nasal cannula, mask, intubation) of oxygen. We also have a rate control on the machine. This allows us to adjust for the CO2 level. So these are two very different functions that give different physical signs and lab values for which we observe.

    Recap: Taking a Breath is about bringing in oxygenated air. That's it, pure and simple (Yeah, right)

    I do hope this clears up the confusion in some way from a as basic as possible medical perspective.
     
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  10. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    And don't forget ..... A flushed beats two pales. :D


    Turtle
     

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