Taking care of a raw brass horn

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Mark_Kindy, Dec 11, 2011.

  1. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    What do you need to do with a raw brass horn in order to keep the brass in good condition that you wouldn't need to worry about as much with lacquer or plated? Is it a bad idea to play on raw brass?

    Thanks,
    Mark
     
  2. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    Not a bad idea at all. The best thing to do is that you should wipe it down after every use so you sweat doesn't do anything to the brass. That is the only special thing to do along with a bath every now and then.
     
  3. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    That's what I was thinking, but the last time I had raw brass was back before my Conn got replated, and I sure wasn't thinking about anything but DON'T DROP IT back then. I'm looking at a raw brass Strad 72, so I wanted to check
     
  4. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    The one on Callett trumpets? If it is then it looks good, could use a really good polish with a cloth and it will look amazing. I dont like to spot on the mouthpiece receiver, but it could be dirt or something else that wipes off easily.
     
  5. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    I found it on TrumpetHerald, but I believe its the same one (the guy mentioned he traded it for his Callet). He says there's no redrot, so I figure the receiver will be ok. I plan to get it checked out if I get it, and cleaned/polished. Seems like a heck of a deal for 750, I'm willing to check it out.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2011
  6. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Raw brass horns were not made to be shiny. The patina IS the part that makes them cooler!
     
  8. hhsTrumpet

    hhsTrumpet Piano User

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    You should probably wash your hands after you play, just to be safe.
     
  9. harleyt26

    harleyt26 Mezzo Forte User

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    My 1923 22B is raw brass. It came that way when it was new. It was called "burnished raw brass" in the Conn catalogue at that time and was a regular finish option on many of the horns. I like the look of the soft patina and it requires very little care plus you don't have to worry about wearing the laquer or plating. Now if you want the raw brass to stay shiny,that could require a lot of work. I just stripped a 1949 36A cornet. This is the first horn I have stripped of laquer and only did so because some jerk painted it with gold paint on the valve cluster put a valve protector on it and took poor resolution pictures to flip it on ebay. It is a very nice horn otherwise so I kept it. It looks great shiny and polished now but I think I will let it Patina like my 23 22B. I will find out as time passes if my stripped and polished 36A ages like my burnished brass 22B. I will wipe it down after each use but do not plan to keep it polished I fear that could be detremental to the engraving and brass in general.
     
  10. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    Just so you are aware, this horn is a lightweight. You can tell that by the use of yellow brass for the slide receivers rather than nickel-silver.
     

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