Talent or Hard Work

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by schleiman, Oct 30, 2010.

  1. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    yes trickg, I think that was my point. No doubt there are many people that have the X factor - unfortunately I don't appear to be one of those. I will say this though. When I was in High School -there were a couple of people who had that X factor. I mean there was this 1 trumpet player, and 1 drummer -- who really "just got it" -- and I am certain they could have been a pros. A few years later I bumped into each of them -- they had quit playing their instruments. NOT because of "frustration" that so many of us feel from time to time -- BUT because they were bored - the instrument was too easy for them, they didn't enjoy it -- or whatever --- but they lacked heart (they lacked the H factor) to continue to expand on the gift that God had given them.
     
  2. schleiman

    schleiman Piano User

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    I understand your point Trickg, the interesting is that I have quite a bit of "X" Factor when it comes to pop songwriting, singing, and guitar. But trumpet is such a different and demanding beast. The most important part is that I enjoy it, even on my "off" days. :) This instrument can be sooo frustrating but sooo rewarding. I can't wait to be good enough to play with others.
     
  3. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    I highly recommend reading Talent Is Overrated by Geoff Colvin. What he reveals is that what great performers have in common is the use of "deliberate practice" and opportunity - meaning the kind of environment which is conducive to and facilitates the use of deliberate practice from an early age.

    It is a very well-written book and worth reading.
     
  4. Mark B

    Mark B Pianissimo User

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    This speaks volumes. While I agree there has to be a certain amount of talent, or a natural ear for music, I believe the biggest difference in a person that makes it and one that doesn't is the willingness to put in the work. By that, I mean the boring, day to day drills that drone on and on and are not fun to play or listen to.

    It's the same way with anything. You don't get to the next level at basketball without hours and hours of shooting free throws, hours and hours of jump shots, hours and hours of layups.

    It's like a friend once said to me, "You don't practice until you get it right, you practice until you can't get it wrong." Yeah, buddy!

    Mark
     
  5. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    KT, your point about having heart, or the "H" factor is a good one. As an example, I knew a guy when I was going to band camp at CSU in Fort Collins, Colorado in the summers. He and I sat next to each other the last two years I attended. The first year, he was one seat higher than me, the next one seat lower. ** He was a solid player - good reader, solid technique, but he had blistering range - like screaming Bbs above high C and with the occasional double C - and he had good improvisational chops and was totally into music, both Jazz and classical. He grew up in a musical family - his older brother was a DCI soloist in the Velvet Knights, and his Dad was a school band director. Not surprisingly, he went to college as a music major, and I lost touch with him during that time - probably sometime around 1990/91.

    I reconnected with him a few years back and was surprised to learn that not only did he not finish his music degree, he doesn't play trumpet at all anymore. He said he tried to get back into a community band thing, but the amazing chops he'd once had were gone, and he just wasn't that interested in regaining them. He finished an education degree and teaches at the high school level - Spanish, if memory serves.

    Somewhere along the way he lost the heart for it. It just wasn't what drove him anymore. He was talented, had good chops, and while he may never have gone pro, he could have continued to gig - he'd have been at home in any Big Band or jazz combo. I'm not saying this is bad - I'm simply saying that it wound up meaning something different for him than it did for me. I've never been able to fully let it go. Music is so much a part of my life that no matter where I am technically as a player, I'm still going to look for ways to do it.

    ** To be clear, I never felt I was a better player than him - my sound was maybe a bit thicker and I might have edged him out playing classical repertoire, but he was most certainly a better jazz player than me, and he was a year younger, both in age and in school.
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2010
  6. MTROSTER

    MTROSTER Piano User

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    In any branch of music, I've never known any talented musician succeed without hard work.:play:
     
  7. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    so the post really should have started out "Talent or Hard Work AND Heart"?
    BTW - Trickg, I enjoy your insight, your willingness to communicate your experiences - even down to the "home recording studio" gear that you have. --- it is very helpful to me as a comebacker. thank you

    ((or shall I say thank you Patrick Gleason? BTW my name is ken switzer, but nobody has ever heard of me anyhow))
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2010
  8. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Thanks Ken! My only goal on this site is to chat it up with like minded folks and to share some of my experiences, and maybe it will help someone avoid some of the stumbling and bumbling I've done along the way trying to make my way as a musician. I don't know what I would do without music - it has been a focal point of my life since I was a kid. I may not be great at it, but it sure has been a fun ride along the way! :D
     
  9. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    Yes Patrick,
    I am trying that also -- to give hope and helpful advice to comebackers. My theme is comeback "better than you ever thought you could be". Many comebackers like me don't have the "X" factor, but we have a motivation, a love, or Heart for the instrument that we want to share with others. I know in many of my posts I discuss the Double High C (DHC) and how I am working on that for a gig on Jan 29th -- either that or "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" in 3 octaves (from the Low F# to the A below DHC) --that will be 25 months into a comeback - I think I will be able to do that, and have it sound reasonably musical - if I don't freeze up in front of the audience.
    BUT I should re-iterate the important things:
    #1) I have had 2 gigs at my church in the last year -- neither one went above the F on the staff (I should do more "offereings", "special music", etc., I know, I know, I know)
    #2) The last gig was "Amazing Grace" which didn't exceed the 4th line D in the staff
    #3) The church members here on TM should understand this (and hopefully nonbelievers will also) -- all you need to do is "Play to the best of your ability" and God will cause someone to be inspired by your playing.
    #4) there is no gig -"too small" - "Amazing Grace" yielded a request to make a CD of Marching songs for a local self defense class - (and I assured the requester that my Home Recording Studio is only my PC, and really not "audio qualty". Nonetheless, I was reassured that it is NOT audio quality that they were requesting -- but it was merely MY SOUND. There is something intangible, unexplainable that they wanted -- (grace notes, an octave shift, some extra tonguing?) -- I don't know exactly -- but they wanted that.
    #5) I guess -- everyone out there wants to sound like someone else (Chet Baker, Doc Severinsen, Chuck Mangione, Maynard, Al Hirt, Wilmer Wise, etc.) but when they FIND their SOUND, that is of good quality -- they should develop that!!!
    -------when someone makes a request like that -----"I want YOUR sound, I must admit -- that is a very humbling request, exciting, but humbling ----
    REMEMBER -- COMEBACK, PLAY, AND BE BETTER THAN YOU THOUGHT YOU COULD BE!! some of that is hard, patient, diligent work, some of that is God's grace, some is Heart -- I know not which is which, I know I just need to play the trumpet!
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2010

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