Teacher or no

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Terrizzi, Oct 31, 2010.

  1. Terrizzi

    Terrizzi New Friend

    26
    1
    Oct 18, 2010
    Jacksonville FL
    I am a comeback player, I have not played for the past 18 years and have played almost everyday for 2.5 months now. I am really enjoying it and am wanting to teach my children. I am of course somewhat disappointed that I cannot play like Andre or Marsalis yet. Does it really take about 2 years of practice to be pleasing to the ears?

    Does anyone teach classical trumpet in Jacksonville FL? I want someone who can play Arbans flawlessly if I do get a teacher. I am a business owner and serious about family, but really want to be good at this. I am teachable.

    Adjunct question #1: Are there any self help videos that have helped you tremendously, especially with range and embouchure developement?

    Question #2 Can you teach a 6 year old to play? My son cannot play above low D on the cornet right now. In your opinion, can a 6 year old play the trumpet? I don't want to push him, but this is great for teaching a child more than just trumpet.
     
  2. s.coomer

    s.coomer Forte User

    1,827
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    Mar 25, 2005
    Indianapolis, In
    Welcome to TM, enjoy your stay. As far as teachers in your area are concerned contact the nearest college to you and then find out who the trumpet teacher is. Contact the teacher and see if the teacher will take you as a private student. If not possibly they can recommend someone in the area or a graduate student of theirs. As far as a six year old learning to play I have had some experience teaching them and if it is a really serious kid with the right setting it is possible to teach them to play. You may want to think about a cornet for them as the size is a little more manageable at that age.
     
  3. Phil986

    Phil986 Forte User

    1,094
    329
    Nov 16, 2009
    Near Portland, OR.
    I hear you bro...
    Just kidding. Better get used to that disappointment, it's not going away any time soon.
    As for being teachable, you obviously have the right attitude but keep in mind that time on the horn is the most important factor. Progress might remain elusive if you can't devote an hour a day to practice (and even more as you get better).

    I started practicing regularly again in August 2009; by March 2010 I was back around the level I had when I left playing go to the wayside (which was not that high). Then I got a teacher. In retrospect, I should have started with a teacher from the beginning (of the come back). As for teaching kids, I've heard that it's best to wait until they have their permanent front teeth, but perhaps some teachers have different approaches.
     
  4. Markie

    Markie Forte User

    2,156
    15
    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
    Terrizzi sez:
    "I am of course somewhat disappointed that I cannot play like Andre' or Marsalis."
    ---
    Only somewhat?
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2010
  5. Markie

    Markie Forte User

    2,156
    15
    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
    Originally Posted by Terrizzi
    I am a comeback player, I have not played for the past 18 years and have played almost everyday for 2.5 months now. I am really enjoying it and am wanting to teach my children. I am of course somewhat disappointed that I cannot play like Andre or Marsalis yet. Does it really take about 2 years of practice to be pleasing to the ears?
    -------
    A)It depends on you.
    -------

    Does anyone teach classical trumpet in Jacksonville FL?
    A) Check with the University
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    I want someone who can play Arbans flawlessly if I do get a teacher.
    ------
    A)There are a lot of people out there that can play Arban's flawlessly and couldn't teach a dog to come. There's a PROFOUND difference between performing and teaching.
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    I am a business owner and serious about family, but really want to be good at this. I am teachable.
    -----
    A)Time will tell
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    Adjunct question #1: Are there any self help videos that have helped you tremendously, especially with range and embouchure developement?
    -----
    A)Thomas, Trumpet Secrets DVD
    Clark Terry DVD
    NYU Jazz series
    -----
    Question #2 Can you teach a 6 year old to play? My son cannot play above low D on the cornet right now. In your opinion, can a 6 year old play the trumpet? I don't want to push him, but this is great for teaching a child more than just trumpet.

    -----
    My daughter started trumpet when she was two. She began with just a mouthpiece and was shown how to buzz it. Around age 3 or 4 she got a pocket trumpet. She's now 7 and plays a Bach 37.
    She also takes piano lessons and to augment the learning, she writes out the piano songs in trumpet and plays all the songs on trumpet she has to learn in piano class that week. That way she knows how to play the songs on piano and trumpet.
     
  6. craigph

    craigph Piano User

    472
    20
    Mar 12, 2010
    Japan
    2.5 months is a relatively short time. This is a marathon, not a sprint. But on the upside, it takes a lot less time to re-learn things the second time around. I think it depends on a couple things: (1) what level you were when you stopped playing and (2) how much practice you can regularly get. If you were a very good college-level player 18 years ago I would think that you could become "pleasing to the ears" than if you were just a competant player. And someone who can put in 60 minutes of dedicated practice each day will make faster progress than someone who can only put in 60 minutes on the weekend. You didn't mention how much practice or what kind you do.

    About your son - when you say low D are you talking about the D below the staff? (1 step above low D?) I started to play trumpet when I was 6 or 7 (noone in my family can remember but we think it was closer to 7 than 6.) All of my brothers and I started to take piano lessons at 5 and then start to learn a band instrument as well within a couple years. I think it is great to start an instrument at a young age. In the book 'Outliers' the author makes the claim that the number of dedicated hours on task separate the people we think of as 'geniuses' in their fields (sports, music, computers...) from the rest, and in most of those cases those people got a start in their field at a young age.

    I am another comeback player. I had about 20 years off before I started back. I didn't play much for about the 1.5 years after I picked it up again. I would just pick it up and play through a few tunes and wonder if I could ever sound decent again. I have been practicing regularly for the past year and think I became 'pleasing to the ear' again after about 6 months or so. but my problem is that my life is far too busy much of the year to be able to practice as much as I would like. I would like to be able to do 2 hours a day, but recently many days I get in 15 minutes, or 0 minutes, and then maybe an hour another day. That makes for a slow way to complete this 'marathon' of a comeback.
     
  7. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

    16,397
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    Dec 22, 2008
    Virginia
    If you can afford a teacher get one. There are reams of information available now because of the net. You just have to figure out what works best for you. You tube has hundreds, maybe thousands of instructional videos for trumpet. The Salvation Army vids are really good, and you know they are credible. Many are just a waste of time focusing only one range to the exclusion of proper technique. I always consider the source when watching these vids. I wish you well on your journey, it's my journey too. I would let your 6 yr old play but not get too rigid. Just let him have a good time so he enjoys it.:thumbsup:
     
  8. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Jun 6, 2010
    Oregon
    I can't imagine it takes 2 years to become "pleasing to the ear", if it's what I think you mean. If you don't sound pleasing to your own ear after 2 years, then it's time to think about playing the piano.

    As for a 6 year old playing trumpet, I can't see why not. A 2 1/2 year old Chinese girl began violin (one of my friend's students) and was playing Bach by three. Of course that's on a TINY 1/16 size violin. It would be dangerous to begin a small child on a violin that's too big, they run the risk of hand injury and only move to bigger violins as their hands grow into them. I don't think this would be an issue ... pushing buttons is not the same as stretched hand fretting.

    Turtle

    Turtle
     
  9. edfitzvb

    edfitzvb Forte User

    2,304
    1,431
    Jun 10, 2008
    Woodlawn, VA
    By all means, get a teacher. There is no substitute for someone who knows what they're doing, can see and hear what you're doing. and can provide guidance and feedback. It takes the guesswork out of your regimen.
    As to starting at six, I agree that the cornet is a better way to start than the trumpet. It is closer to the body than the trumpet and usually speaks just a bit easier. Choose wisely, though. Some cornets are heavier than others.
    Don't place unreasonable expectations at that age, though. It would be a shame to have the child view music as a chore.
     
  10. Alex_C

    Alex_C Piano User

    449
    6
    May 30, 2010
    Gilroy, California
    I'm pro-teacher too, although I can't afford one myself. Once I have the cash flow, I want to find this good guy who's supposed to be in Hollister, California, and see if I can study with him.
     

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