Teaching my daughter......

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by shooter, Mar 3, 2012.

  1. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Bob makes a great point. Let the pro handle lessons but play along with her during practice. While I have taught private lessons many years ago when I was highly involved in teaching music, I decided to let my son learn from another as figured he would listen better. However, I occasionally played with him during practice (he didn't realize he was getting private lessons from me- just thought we were having fun. After 3 1/2 years he finally figured it out and now occasionally asks for help.
     
  2. acarcido

    acarcido Forte User

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    You know, I agree with the majority vote. I tried teaching my own son to play but being that I'm dad, and he see's how much I practice. I think he wasn't having fun and truly putting forth an effort. I did manage to show him the basics and boy, he has a natural emboucher and can get up in the staff without much effort. But he would not take my instruction of a slow structure method. He was picking up bad habits from some of my buddies that can play great improv style, but they cannot read a single note if their life depended on it. My son would say to me, they can play and never learned to read music. Then, I took out my old Arbans in front of the other guys and I said, open to any page in this book and play it for me for $100. None could do it, and I tell my son. That is why I get paid more than they do. Hahahaha and still I cannot put that discipline in him.

    Good luck to you though.
     
  3. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    duplicate post for some unkown reason -- I wish someone would have taught me how to use this electronic media stuff -- who knows maybe I could figure out how to record my music or something also -- ROFL ROFL ROFL
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2012
  4. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    actually I think you are talking about personalities - - and not so much teaching. your son might be old enough to become his own person, and CHOOSE to develop his own discipline, as he grows into a young adult. My bet is that you don't have a degree in Child psychology, or childhood development --- and your first child -- WAS WHEN YOU BEGAN YOUR CAREER AS A TEACHER. Yes, I suspect that in life, you and/or your wife are the MAIN teachers, after all who taught the kid to tie his shoes, to be potty trained, to learn to eat with a fork --- and of course later in his life -- who is teaching him , sex education, and how to be a decent human being????????? I HOPE you are not leaving that to a stranger!!!!!!!! but actively taking part in your sons EDUCATION -- and you/wife are the HUGEST part of that EDUCATION, or at least should be IMHO -- so yes, I believe parents are adequate to be TEACHERS IMHO
     
  5. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    I think you will know best when it comes to this. Best of luck!
     
  6. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    There is the dual notion of the generalist and the specialist - I for one wouldn't want my old Mum teaching me how to fuel a drag car, or even how to put 183 tonnes of Kero into a B747.

    A parent is exceptionally useful in providing support, but in this case we have a practicioner with substantial knowledge, able to demonstrate and discuss, and who knows how to read the student. The 'conversation' between the two must lead to progress - a great tool when teaching is appropriate and focussed questioning - "How do you think I make this noise on my trumpet? Can you do it too?", "How do I stop my instrument getting all covered in sticky finger marks?", "Do you think it is a good idea to play after eating?", "Does the note you're playing sound pleasant to you? Why not? Can you find a way to make it so?" "So, I've 'punished you for not playing much since we last talked trumpet, do you think I'm being fair?", "What are your plans for your trumpet when we can make some nice tunes together?". Notice, task orientated, student focussed, no wrong answers - just uneducated ones. Note that I'm suggesting an ongoing conversation focussed on the development of the musician and her concept of self in music - she HAS to learn how to think trumpet. NONE of this is teacher focussed. Now the sorts of silly questions asked (and there has to be some) can add humour and fun to the session - "Why has you face gone all red?" "Do you breathe in on the back stroke?" - oh, sorry, golf question. It has to be fun - otherwise you have failed her - when it approaches a shouting match - walk away, come back another day.
     
  7. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    in this case -- I suspect your Mum doesn't wear army boots, or has any experience with fueling a jet --- but in the case of the OP, he seems to have a handle on playing the trumpet -----he might not be a pro at it --- but seldom do we need our parents to be "professional" to show us an ability that they have ----and I will always contend (for the most part) that children are more likely to "listen" and adhere to a parents instructions. ALBEIT that may have changed in the world in the last 30 years ---- but when I was a young boy becoming a man ---I listend, watched, and learned more from my parents than I did anyone else.------------------of course -- there was a period when I was a teenager (perhaps 15-17 year of age ---when I might have thought my Dad was an OLD codger, and had lost his mind ---and when I turned like 19 or 20 years old --- I realized how much DAD LEARNED IN THOSE 3YEARS --- or rather, how ignorant I had been in that phase of my life !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2012
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  8. shooter

    shooter Piano User

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    Thanks KT! I know I'm probably not the perfect candidate to teach one the trumpet, but after four sessions, she's playing G below the staff up to the C in the staff (no flats or sharps yet) and she knows what whole, half, and quarter notes are in 4/4 timing.....and corresponding rests. She's decided she likes the 7C better than the 10-1/2C so I put that one back in the bag. She played "Mary had a Little Lamb" today. Tone still has a long way to go, but, so far, so good. :-)
     
  9. shooter

    shooter Piano User

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    I need to find my old metronome......
     
  10. acarcido

    acarcido Forte User

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    Hahaha KT, you are so right. This is a personality issue with my son. He has his own, and its a natural rebellious one. We are (wife/myself) highly involved in his daily life. I'm a former soldier (US Army) and prefer a structured disciplined approach but with a lot of fun mixed in there. He is only 11 so he tend to not sit still for too long. In a way, I think all parent are masters of many trades expert at none.
     
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