Technique?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Bad Luck Lux, Oct 28, 2011.

  1. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    If you really want to go pro, you'll need to go to a very good music school for a complete music education. You need to know more than just how to play. Music theory, music history, music literature, etc. getting into a good school is very competetive. Private lessons now will increase your chances.Figure out a way to afford them.
     
  2. Kujo20

    Kujo20 Forte User

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    Something you can do to start learning that doesn't include personal lessons is to watch and listen.

    Going to concerts of famous players and listening to recordings will help you get a feel of different aspects of trumpet playing. I think it's a pretty good way to learn.

    Don't get me wrong though! Private lessons are probably the best option to better yourself. Surround yourself with better players and you'll be amazed at how fast you grow!

    Good luck,
    Kujo
     
  3. larry tscharner

    larry tscharner Forte User

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    Kujo has a good point, playing with players that are much better than you can be a big help that costs nothing to do. Ive always been amazed at how poorly I play when the group is lacking, but when Im standing next to a pro or a long time monster player I am totally tuned in to what they are doing and respectfully asking questions. The really good musicians are never threatened and are happy to help someone improve at the thing we both love. Only small players are compeditive when it comes to music. Best wishes.
     
  4. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    I agree, the better players force you to focus - probably more than we normally might - I don't wish to be responsible for spoiling their performance. I do regularly play with professionals - and they, for their part, accept my limitations and offer a lot of encouragement.
     
  5. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Playing with others does help if you keep in mind the necessity to blend with them. This is often a skill beyond what you've been taught as to proper tone and tempo whereas you may have to play sharp or flat that will make other notes wacky so that you've got to develop the ability to lip them into balance with others in the music. I've been playing for many years and will not acclaim that even I have accomplished this with any degree of accuracy as it differs from group to group.

    Still others here have given you some great insight and suggestions, but such will be in vain if you cannot or will not take heed of them. Do your best to develop the basic skills with an established regimen of practice, and enjoy.

    My final thought is that I hope you now can read music well.
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2011
  6. Bad Luck Lux

    Bad Luck Lux New Friend

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    Yep, that's exactly my problem. I play for hours a day every day, but it's not personal practice. It's rehearsal time/performance time. I have hardly any time to actually build my technique. Most of my freetime I have is invested in Technique, however.
     
  7. Bad Luck Lux

    Bad Luck Lux New Friend

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    Exactly my case as well. A little over a year ago I auditioned at a school for jazz. Mind you I've never played jazz before in my life with the exception of my High School's "Jazz" Band (Which wasn't really jazz, Tucson, Arizona has very poor music education in the public schools) I made the top band my first audition. I was thrown in to a band that I honestly wasn't cut out for. They were all players of such high caliber and I? Just another high school trumpet player. These high school students were already professionals (Some, since middle school) However, being around that kind of environment forced me to really focus and not make a fool of myself; and now I've been a solid member of the band for a year and a half, and I've improved drastically since then.
     
  8. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    The OPs last post enlightens the fact that the beginning books used generally in the three years from the 5th grade through 8th grades of public schools DO NOT PROVIDE THE FUNDAMENTALS OF TECHNIQUE essential to elevate playing even to the high school level. and surely not beyond and this is where private teachers / tutors are a must if a student sets his / her goal on getting into a college level program majoring in instrumental music and thsi isn't sayin' all private teachers / tutors are more capable and/or will do any different than the public school instructor. I'm just trying to do the best I can to presently work slurs, articulation, tone, and dynamics into my sessions.
     
  9. mgcoleman

    mgcoleman Mezzo Forte User

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    Don't overlook the possibility of trading some time/effort for lessons. If you are honest about things upfront and show some real passion to learn, you might actually find a local teacher who is willing to accept some sweat equity for lessons (or a discounted rate). Specifically, check with local colleges...it is sometimes amazing the amount of work the professors have to accomplish and a helping hand with a massive desire to learn might be worth some lessons to them. It won't hurt to look around and ask.
     
  10. Bad Luck Lux

    Bad Luck Lux New Friend

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    You know. This I might actually do. For I do desire to improve and become of professional quality.
     

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