Technique

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by crowmanic, Feb 15, 2016.

  1. crowmanic

    crowmanic Mezzo Piano User

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    When playing a chromatic scale from low C to the octave fast my fingering is not clean when I go from the 2nd and 3rd valve to any other valve or valves. I know it's primarily something that should be practiced over and over again with a metronome. But I'm wonder if there are any other bits of information anyone can offer to help me? Arturo Sandoval emphasizes "slamming the valves down". I've taken his meaning with a grain of salt and applied his intention without the success I'm looking for. I don't have a teacher for personal reasons, and hope to pick up some advice on TM. I hope it's not a matter of a mental block that I've created?
     
  2. seilogramp

    seilogramp Piano User

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    Slow the metronome way down until you can play the passage cleanly. It may have to be ridiculously slow to get it right. If you keep playing it over and over while fumbling, then you are essentially practicing playing it wrong. Keep slowing down the metronome, then practice playing it correctly at the slow speed. Then gradually build up the speed over time.

    Clarke Technical Studies for Cornet is a must for any serious trumpet player. Excellent book for training finger coordination. Doesn't matter what level of player you are. Agility with chromatic scales is just one of the many technical aspects covered in this book. Typically going rapidly from 3rd to 2nd valve is the tough fingering. The human hand just isn't designed to do that. Clarke's 2nd study #29 is perfect for getting that down.
     
  3. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    ^^ This. There are no shortcuts. If you want to build better technique, you have to work it, and sometimes you really have to dig in for a while before you see improvement. In your case, for what you are looking to do, a few weeks of taking things slow, speeding them up, slowing them back down - wash, rinse, repeat - it should start to show some fairly dramatic improvement.
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Why bang the valves down? Because if we want to move them quickly and precisely, we have no other choice. Our fingers cannot accelerate and then deccelerate before the valve cap hits the rubber stop.

    We are creatures of habit and need thousands of repetitions to firmly implant motion patterns in our brain. Thousands.
     
  5. J. Jericho

    J. Jericho Fortissimo User

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    ... as long as we don't bang the valves down HARD, disrupting one's embouchure, for instance. No need to use an 8 lb. sledgehammer when a 16 oz. ball pein will do.
     
  6. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    I do Chromatics all the time, without playing at all. To practice Chromatics and scales, just hear in your head, and do it slowly to begin with. Scales and Chromatics will become 2nd nature the more you do it. For me it was years of work, and I am still working on scales and chords, and identifying the notes that I can play through chords... specifically Chords together, and what scale plays best through the run.

    Then I practice with the horn, but sitting on the Loo, waiting for a meeting, sitting at the table, just run through the fingerings as the progression goes through your head.
    Keep practicing

    Cheers

    BTW: when I was young I used to slam the fingers down, now I just use my thumb and run the fingers onto my thumb. The slower the better to start off, then get faster and faster.

    Chromatics - Start on C, then run the chromatic starting on the next 1/2 up, so C to C, then C# to C# etc... continue to the High C. Then come down the same way.
     
  7. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    My basic warm-up is the chromatic scale, slowly on first pass and then progressively faster, ascending as high as I can and descending as low as I can. The tough part is lipping in the squirrelys.
     
  8. crowmanic

    crowmanic Mezzo Piano User

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    Nov 9, 2015
    Thanks Seilogramp,
    I have Clarke and need to spend more time with it. I'll pay special attention to 2nd study #29. I'll slow the metronome down and make an effort to stop "playing it wrong". Thanks again.
     
  9. crowmanic

    crowmanic Mezzo Piano User

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    Nov 9, 2015
    Thanks for the encouragement. I'll do what you say because I know it's the way.
     
  10. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    Bang them down - and bang them up.
     

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