Technology

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by ricecakes230, Aug 25, 2013.

  1. ricecakes230

    ricecakes230 Pianissimo User

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    Jan 15, 2013
    Texas
    Anyone know any type of program that could maybe help me hear what my music sounds like? I have a tough audition my school district's music program holds, the music is meant to challenge seniors. You could imagine how hard it might be for a freshman. Anyone in texas, it's region music. I would prefer the program to be free and on the computer of course ;-)
     
  2. GijsVis

    GijsVis Piano User

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    Jul 23, 2012
    Finale NotePad is free, but stops working after a certain period of time. I'ld recommend Sibelius, which is nog for free, but it works brilliantly. Your school itself is also likely to have a music program, maybe you can use that. And otherwise there is old fashioned listening of the song anywhere (youtube, Spotify, CDs, etc)
     
  3. tjcombo

    tjcombo Forte User

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    Melbourne, Australia
    Audacity is a freeby multi-track program. Works well and easy to use.

    Keep in mind that the microphone is most likely to be the limiting factor, however even a cheap condenser mic will do an ok job if you don't overload it. Cheap dynamic mics can terrible.
     
  4. GijsVis

    GijsVis Piano User

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    Oh, wait, did you mean hearing what you need to play, or hearing how you play it? In the first case, check my previous post, or else, a lot of programs can do the job, you might not even need one if you don't plan on editting anything and buy a cheap condenser mic or just any other decent quality mic.
     
  5. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    My take is that ricecakes230 is looking for a way to listen to the piece a bunch of times in order to make it easier to play. My take is that we shouldn't need a recording of a piece to play it (although recordings of the piece can useful for style). I've taught a couple of students that had their Haydn ruined by listening to the Boston Pops' recording with Al Hirt.
     
  6. ricecakes230

    ricecakes230 Pianissimo User

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    Jan 15, 2013
    Texas
    My issue is I have really complicated 3 pages of music. I of course want to get a good start on it and I am afraid that I might teach myself the wrong rythme, thus resulting in playing it horribly.
     
  7. GijsVis

    GijsVis Piano User

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    In that case either listen to a recording of the song or put the notes in a program like Finale NotePad or Sibelius, after which you'll be able to hear it
     
  8. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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    Even the hardest of passages can be much easier at a super slow tempo. Quit trying to plow through it and go slowly one measure at a time. Subdivide! Having to hear someone play it so you can learn the rhythms is a bad way to learn.

    You guys that don't know, the TMEA Region material is three etudes from the Voxman Selected Studies book

    FYI: You can hear the TMEA etudes here... but I think it will hinder your progress and development as a trumpet player. You want to learn how to play the TRUMPET, not learn how to play the TUNE. Learn fundamentals (scales, flexibilities, arban, clarke). Learn HOW to practice new music.

    Cornet/Trumpet

    Selected Studies, H. Voxman, Rubank / Hal Leonard

    Performance Guide

    Etude 1:
    Page 19, G Minor, Allegretto affetuoso
    Tempo: Dotted quarter note 72 - 84
    Play: Beginning to end
    Errata: Errata: none

    Etude 2:
    Page 29, A Major, A Major - Allegretto
    Tempo: Quarter note 110 - 130
    Play: Beginning to end
    Errata: none

    Etude 3:
    Page 2, C Major, Adagio cantabile
    Tempo: Quarter note 66 - 84
    Play: Beginning to end - (no repeats)
    Errata: none
     
  9. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    Toronto
    You could always ask a better player than you to help, or get a lesson with a teacher.
     
  10. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    A couple of points. Audition pieces are supposed to hard--that is how they find the best players, and you are wanting a shortcut. The audition should show your ability to puzzle out difficult music. What will do more for you and be the best for you would be to learn to actively subdivide the beat rather than parrot something that is close to being correct.

    A good read:
    Rhythm Series: Improving Rhythmic Accuracy by Subdividing
     

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