Teeth/forward jaw question.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by the newbie, Mar 14, 2012.

  1. the newbie

    the newbie Pianissimo User

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    Jan 27, 2011
    San Francisco
    If someone has an overbite should they push their bottom jaw out to allign with the top ? for correct embouchere?

    I just noticed while playing around today that if i push my lower jaw out so my top and bottom teeth are aligned vertically my lip flesh contact on mp changed with that and i was able to produce a nice easier high note. Its like my top lip will vibrate better behind my bottom as oppossed to top lip in front of bottom.

    I remember hearing a lot of chatter on here about the forward jaw position verses the opposite, it was over my head at the time but just wondering if this is relevant to that. It felt really wierd for me to play like that and uncomfortable, but if needed i would pursue that way if it was correct, just wondering if i should.

    Probably a stupid question to you guys but i'm in the dark here.
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    There is no single correct embouchure. Pushing the bottom jaw out CAN work for some and destroy others. You never know when messing around. You find out weeks to months later when things are going ok or have gotten REAL BAD.

    The first thing you do by moving the jaw is take the pressure off of the upper lip. That may have been the whole reason that you think the upper register got better.

    I do not recommend DIY on big embouchure changes. When things aren't going well, it destroys your psyche - and there is really noone there that knows what can help. Once your face is really broken, the path back is even tougher.
     
  3. the newbie

    the newbie Pianissimo User

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    Thanks, i'm just gonna try and experiment some more again tomorrow. It sure does takes a lot of pressure off my top lip when i push out my lower jaw. Just to make things even more tricky, my overbite consists of my 2 front rabbit teeth protruding and then my k9s, but the 2 teeth between my front and my k9s are pretty flush with the bottom row! quite messed up, look okay but for a trumpeters point of view i got a pretty harsh deal. But not the end of the world. i heard Jon faddis got his teeth straigtened but then couldnt play right so he went and got them crookeded again! lol. Chet baker got his kicked out trying to rip off the wrong dealer and he managed to play again with dentures. So thanks yeah im just gonna tred lightly from here on.
     
  4. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    AS rowuk said, everyone is different. I have a severe overbite and play with my jaw slightly forward. I can't play if I align my top and bottom teeth. It put too much stress on my jaw. But that's jusy me. Put your jaw where you get the best easiest results.
     
  5. 7cjbill2

    7cjbill2 Pianissimo User

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    Whatever works, I had the problem of pulling down and moving my bottom jaw in and it was NOT the way for me. It seems to me most really good players have a nice, level horn. rowuk is right, though, sometimes it takes months to determine if something is right or wrong for you. :(
     
  6. Doug1951

    Doug1951 New Friend

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    Dec 23, 2011
    North Carolina
    Newbie...I am playing again after a 30 year "raising the family" furlow......
    I have an overbite as well and unfortunately my first band director was a woodwind player and
    was just happy if I made sounds on key....which I did becasue of my background in singing and piano...
    I am older now.....but the overbite remains..........but.......I have been fortunate in finding this forum and some musician friends to feed from as I play again.......We overbiters were not designed to play a trumpet mpc......
    My greatest improvement as I have began to play again with a little more focus on quality of sound is
    lower and upper teeth separation.....(to think about it as I play)....of course it allows more air flow and
    it addresses the overbiters natural tendency to clamp down to tighten the lips.........
    Just food for thought......from a now "thinking" comebacker.......
    On emboucher changes (just as in changing your golf club grip)........most of the time little..is more....

    Had we been inspired to play sax rather than trumpet
    we wouldnt have to deal with these issues..Ha
     
  7. patkins

    patkins Forte User

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    I had a small overbite to begin with and played the trumpet with the teeth as close to flush without any instruction. Merely because that is what felt normal and gave me the best sound. Years later, I wore braces for 4.5 yrs to correct the overbite and teeth becoming out of line. I still held my trumpet and mouth the same way but it took about 6 mos. to get used to it. No big deal to me. I liked playing the trumpet and figured, all that matters is do you love playing enough to tough it out no matter what obstacle may present. I find it encouraging when other players have faced major obstacles and kept on playing trumpet. Let her rip!
     
  8. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    Doug, becasue we have an overbite we shouldn't play trumpet? Not so, As I said earlier I have a severe overbite and it has never slowed me down. I've had a very good professional career for 44 years.
     
  9. Doug1951

    Doug1951 New Friend

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    Bob with all due respect.........That is not what I said at all.............I happen to be playing trumpet as well as enjoying it and will continue to........I developed a love for the instrument early on..........
    My comment was....>>>>>>>Had we been inspired.......to play sax.........rather than trumpet..........our overbite would not be a significant issue.........(as I play sax too.......I know this to be a fact)........
    an overbite rarely is argued by most people to not be as condusive to brass motuhpieces as a normal bite......
    sorry you got confused when you read my comment......
    but if you think it doesnt present certain structural challenges.(that granted, can be overcome) then I respect your right to have that opinion........My opinion and what I said.........remains steadfast.....
    glad you are enjoying such an esteemed career.........smiles
     

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