The 12B:(. Back from tech, really bad news...

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Sherri, Sep 18, 2010.

  1. Sherri

    Sherri New Friend

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    Sep 16, 2010
    Hi...
    I want to thank you so so much Moshe for your detailed cleaning description, it was amazing!

    Tobylou, Come Back Kid, Chet Fan, Veery715, Mark B, Keehun, Nieuwguyski, I want to sincerely thank all of you for your help and comments.

    This is about the 1952 Conn 12B that was given to my husband in the early 1970's. It has been stored in its case since then...

    I am SO disappointed...Big major problems with our Trumptet. Turns out that it WAS re-lacquered likely in the '60's before it was given to my husband.

    The color does not look as if it had been, but the tech said that they don't *all* have an obvious color change and sometimes it takes a pro tech repair guy to know.

    If that is not bad enough, the lead pipe has a slight curve to it:-(. I did not notice until he pointed it out. I never knew what to look for.

    He confused me by saying it was in good condition 'except' for the curve. He stated that the re-lacquer is something fairly common but I know that and the bend *especially* obviously reduces it to no monetary value.

    I want to still spend the $ to have it cleaned and properly oiled. The tech turned the slide right side up for me (it came off easily, surprisingly after sitting in its case since 1972 or so!) and gave it a good look over, took the valves out oiled it some, played it and said it only needed cleaning and a proper oil after that.

    Ok, so I nearly cried...:oops: thinking it must have been in an accident to curve the lead pipe.......and then for his Uncle to have refinished it just makes me a little sad ya know?

    So to all you experts out there; what would you do about the leadpipe?

    The tech said it is 'my' decision but that in his opinion it was more cosmetic than play affecting and taking it apart and re-soldering etc. would not be *his* choice.

    Nothing I can do about the lacquer of course, but is there something I should be doing now that it is out of its case to keep it clean? (I am thinking it would be different if it was the original finish).

    If you have read all of this, thank you for attending my pity party and if any of you have had something like this happen to you please let me know I am not alone! :>).

    Oh, the tech said it would be a $60 cleaning/oil fee. Is that about right? He said no parts needed replacing, ie; corks? etc. I found his name on the list posted on this site btw, so thank you for that, it really helped.

    Now knowing this, do you think I should just let our 11yo son play it at home after all? I still want to learn on it as well but my husband does want to sell it someday...IF able, but I am guessing there would really not be a profit after cleaning etc. so why not just keep and enjoy?

    Thank you again for all your help and I welcome your advice very much!

    Blessings,
    Sherri
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2010
  2. SteveRADavey

    SteveRADavey Pianissimo User

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    Austin, TX
    It doesn't sound so bad as all that! It depends on how slight the curve in the leadpipe is, but if the tech thinks it doesn't affect playing, I think I would be optimistic. And as far as I can tell, nobody really cares about whether the laquer is original. I certainly don't (I've stripped the laquer off a couple of my horns right away anyhow. Of course, neither of them is a 12b).

    I certainly wouldn't say that those two issues rob the horn of any monetary value. My guess is you've still got a very desirable piece. Of course, if you are convinced that they do, I'd be happy to take it off your hands for a nominal price ;-).

    - Steve-o
     
  3. Sherri

    Sherri New Friend

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    Sep 16, 2010
    OH Steve! Thank you soooo much for that! This is the first laugh I have had concerning our horn in 2 days:roll:. The way the tech talked the horn was doomed b/c of the relacquer. OK, maybe not *doomed*, but I was disheartened to hear it nonetheless.

    Thank you for making my day feel much brighter and I will give a really really really really looooong consideration of your offer to 'take it off your hands for a nominal price'ROFL

    Again, thank you! I did not ask if it was a poor relacquer job, but if it was, should I have it re-done again??? Such a newbie, I know.

    Sherri
     
  4. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    I'll give 5 bucks more than he will ( if my wife says its okay) !;-)
     
  5. Sherri

    Sherri New Friend

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    Sep 16, 2010
    Oh, BTW, The pics on the Conn Loyalist site are what convinced me it was the original lacquer...the color looks *exactly* like the 2nd picture...of the 50's-60's horns...not at all like the last pic that is pink.

    Hey, I am getting an education at least and loving 'that' part of this adventure........

    Sherri
     
  6. Sherri

    Sherri New Friend

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    Sep 16, 2010
    Awww, Gee.....Tobylou...I'm overwhelmed. Truly.;-)

    (btw...I am keeping it for a while b/c without it I would not have all of you to banter with:roll:)

    Thx,
    Sherri
    p.s. tell that wife of yours that she is doing a wonderful job with you!! You have learned to ask permission...............you must be a very happy man.;-)
     
  7. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    I personally wouldn't let the tech clean it. They usually soak it in a chemical solution and it does an okay job but can cause the valves to be sluggish for a while. If you are first learning, it can be aggravating. Had this done to a Getzen with lightning fast valves and it took months to get it back right. Fortunately I have a dozen horns to choose from. Asked the store mgr about it and he said "Oh, they all do that but it will be okay". Wouldn't have done it had I known. You will do just as well if you clean it yourself. Use a dish washing soap with degreaser and soak it as long as you want (rubbermaid or equivalent storage container). The longer you soak, the more crud will come out. Did this to a Conn 80A, and a horn that seemed useless is now an excellent player. I soaked it for 3 days. It sounds extreme but I can now play it on gigs. Don't do this to the valves, you will damage the felt and mess up the valve alignment. I would repair the lead pipe if it's only bent, not cracked. If its cracked you could replace it but to a collector it will have no value. You would still have a very nice looking, playing horn though. Lacquer looked fine to me. If it was redone, it was a long time ago because it isn't "new penny pink" and has had time to age. Remember I'll give $5 more than anyone else , if my wife lets me.ROFL
     
  8. Sherri

    Sherri New Friend

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    Sep 16, 2010
    Ok, I guess I am just a little nervous about cleaning it myself....afraid I won't put it back together correctly:oops:. Now, I can read schematics/blueprints with the best of them, but I am skeeerd to take this guy apart and put him back together! lol.

    I will take a few deep breaths.......Moshe gave an excellent post on cleaning etc. as well, so I should be ok.

    So~~~~even though this tech comes from the (I don't remember acronym??? Begins with 'N') list, I should still avoid him?

    The lead pipe is not 'bent' as much as it has a curve to it. IOW, there is not a particular spot that is bent as in it could crack, just sways.......clear as mud?

    Sorry for the cleaning question, it may feel as though you are trying to explain Heaven to bears when talkin' at me:roll: but I listen well LOL.

    (Is that $5 on top of the other $5??? WOW. We are really making progress ;-)).
    Sherri
     
  9. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    I have never had this happen to a horn I have Chemically or Ultrasonically cleaned. What's the story?

    I would give the tech the go ahead.
     
  10. Moshe Mizrachi

    Moshe Mizrachi Pianissimo User

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    Feb 17, 2010
    A slight bend in the leadpipe is no big deal.
    It's very minor.
    Any competent repair man should be able to fix that easily.
    And some trumpets come from the factory with a slight bend in the leadpipe being deliberate so that no repair is needed, no repair should be done.

    He might be wrong about that being a re-lacquer.
    But even if he is right about it being a re-lacquer, there is still significant value in your trumpet.
    Especially if they used the old-fashioned type of lacquer from many years ago rather than using today's modern lacquers, and if they did a good re-lacquer job rather than an amateurish job..

    I wonder if the person you talked to was deliberately bad-mouthing the trumpet because he wanted to offer you less for it than it is really worth in case he could convince you to sell it to him?
    Been known to happen MANY times...

    I have also encountered technicians who are great at repairing modern instruments but who have no knowledge of vintage instruments.
    One technician I once encountered saw the dark original lacquer of my 1940's Conn and he actually thought that it was just tarnished bare brass!!!

    So your Conn 12B is still worth a LOT, and it is still worth CHERISHING.

    I hope you don't appraise the value of your kids the same way you appraise the value of the trumpet :D

    "His ears stick out a little bit, so I know he's worthless..."

    "One eye is a tiny bit higher than the other eye, so I know nobody would give a wooden nickel for her..."

    "His smile is crooked, so I guess I should give up on his ever finding a wife..."

    .
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2010

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