The Basics - What is Most Important?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Jack C., Oct 15, 2009.

  1. dhbailey

    dhbailey Piano User

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    It's important to note, however, that using different mouthpieces on the same trumpet can alter the harmonics/partials which stack up in the room, so it's not always easy to know which sound is "the" sound for any particular trumpet. To Vulgano's advice I would simply add that you'll know you're making the right fundamental sound when the combination mouthpiece/trumpet you're playing makes the sound easy to get out and not feel restricted when you play.

    Another factor which affects the whole issue is the person playing the instrument -- I don't feel there really is a single correct sound for any one trumpet to get out. They can all be made to play so differently in the hands of different people and with different mouthpieces.

    Essentially, when you have found the mouthpiece and trumpet combination which produces a sound which fits *your* concept of trumpet sound which you want to make, then you've found the right combination.
     
  2. frankmike

    frankmike Piano User

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    this is actually a valid question, and the answer is 1st, because that is the most used valve, and because it is first in line when the spit attacks
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2009
  3. dhbailey

    dhbailey Piano User

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    Huh? Guess you don't play much in Ab or Db or Gb or E or B or F#. :-)

    But on the other hand, the valve which is used the most will probably work the easiest even without oil, so perhaps the answer, to use your logic would be that the 3rd valve should be oiled the most to ensure that when needed it will work. ;-)
     
  4. frankmike

    frankmike Piano User

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    No I play But I prefer _ T _ for F (concert pitch) than TTT, so It adds on number of uses for 1st
     
  5. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Wow, all of them are important. I don't know if I can rate them since taking one of them out can result in a less than stellar performance
     
  6. frankmike

    frankmike Piano User

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    it is incredible what you cand do with just 1st valve, it is magic valve.

    I will upload some footage on youtube,
     
  7. Jack C.

    Jack C. New Friend

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    Aug 20, 2009
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    By competition I mean, somewhat the opposite of cooperation, (i.e., trying to "out-play" others in the section or to prove superiority in some way).

    Several observed examples:
    1. The new player to an ensemble who, before assignment, searches the folders, and takes a seat as Principle or lead player. (Extreme example here.)

    2. The individual who is vigilant to insure he or she has the best or better parts to play (similar to above) (Example: One fellow was observed to be going through other players folders to find parts that he may wish to play. Later, when that same new member heard another performer playing a solo passage he asked the sectioned leader if he could play the solo. Yes, that did really take place and yes the Section Leader was not amused.) There were no deficiencies in the performance of the solo player.

    3. This example could be called [dueling trumpets]. This form of competition most often occurs before rehearsals begin, during the warm up period in the ready room, or even on stage. Here, I am referring to two or more players trying to out-play or out-perform one another with regard to a particular passage, exercise, high or low notes, scales, and so on. In a Jazz Band, a few years back, one of the section members seemed to be trying to prove that he could play a few of the lead solos better than our assigned ,excellent and long time, lead player. Yes we did pass the lead solos around at times for the usual reasons. This player's attempts to better the lead player occurred during breaks, between sets, during warm-ups and during warm-downs, etc.). The band's director later had a talk with this fellow - no more problem.

    These are just a few examples.

    Years ago a fellow trumpet player told me that he believed "trumpet players are a very competitive bunch". Perhaps he was correct?
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2009
  8. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Not only correct, but very diplomatic! The best players do tend to be the most humble. Not being a jerk is one of the quickest ways to convince people one can play.

    Competition can be fun, though--a friend and I used to put our trumpets on the floor, step back 10 paces, then race to our trumpets to see could pick up our horn and play a high c first. We added a half step each round.

    We, uhhh, helped pay for our repair tech's new boat, though.
     

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