The Descending Blues......by

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by crowmadic, Sep 30, 2009.

  1. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 3, 2006
    I have a "technical" question, but first let me invite you to send your version of "The Descending Blues" to [email protected] . I know you're eager to write a tune with that title.
    Question: One of my daily exercises is to play SCALES in 3rds, triplets, and 16th notes up and down. There are rarely stumbles ascending, but frequently stumbles descending. Is this another affliction of old age/intellect/mental agility, or more common than one thinks? If there's a fix please let me know.

    crow
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2009
  2. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    Do you mean you are going up in 5ths? And down in 5ths? Or down in 4ths?

    Probelm with "the Descending Blues" is that eventually you have to hit bottom.

    v
     
  3. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 3, 2006
    Please read my THREAD again. I think my discription of the exercise is clearer after editing.

    crow
     
  4. Sofus

    Sofus Forte User

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    Jul 26, 2008
    If you play thirds, it´s more a broken chord than a scale.
    A scale would also contain all the notes in between.

    Can you both slur and play these notes with attack when going up,
    and is it harder to get the notes or maybe the right notes on the way
    down?
     
  5. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 3, 2006
    I forget that it is important to be extremely detailed in wording a Thread if you expect to be understood on TM. I hope the effort will result in constructive advise. OK........While sitting in a chair, I put the trumpet to my lips, and without reading, I use the C scale to begin the exercise; other scales follow. I play C below the staff, and then play the E above it. Then I play the next note in the C scale which is D, and then play the F above it. I continue to do this until the third line B to D, completing my ascent on 3rd space C. Then I work my way down doing the same thing in reverse. What happens on the way down, playing at a moderate speed, is that I STUMBLE IN MY MIND, AND THEREFORE IN MY FINGERS, TO REMEMBER WHAT NOTE COMES NEXT, UNLESS I EXERT STRONGER CONSENTRATION THAN WHEN I ACCEND. I generally accend thought free, at least to where it's noticeable. Perhaps I should be asking a Brain Surgeon this question, "Is it inherantly more difficult to recall decending letters/notes/numbers than when ascending? By the way, the triplets and 16th notes are done in the same way as the above, which I call 3rds. If this doesn't clear up my original question, [email protected]#$^&$#&

    crow
     
  6. dhbailey

    dhbailey Piano User

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    Jul 28, 2009
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    I thought the blues was all about hitting bottom to begin with;-)
     
  7. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    Ithaca NY
    crowmadic,

    Please don't get annoyed with us. We want to help and if there is a gap in understanding it is only because we have taken the time to respond so you can clarify.

    I call what you are doing ascending and descending intervals - in this case (diatonic) thirds. C, E, D, F, E, G, F, A, G, B, A, C, B, D, C. (You could do the same exercise with any interval). I think the problem lies with how we generally practice scales. We usually start low and play up and then down. The muscle memory is quickly reversed when you descend. With the intervals, the reverse doesn't occur. IOW, when you get to the top of a diatonic scale your fingers just do the opposite when you descend. With the 3rd interval added, you skip the next to last 3 fingerings you played when when going up - C (skipping D,B,C) A, back a 2nd to B (skipping C, S, B) G, etc..

    You can try, after ending on 3rd space C, going back to D, then B, then C, then A..... This reverses the fingerings on the way up by adding the three missing pitches all the way back down.

    Or another idea, is to start with the descending scales, at first just the diatonic pitches, then after you become comfortable with that, introduce the 3rds. Your fingers likely know the way up much better than the way down.

    A last suggestion is to write it out, and read it, until it becomes 2nd nature.

    veery
     
  8. equivariant

    equivariant New Friend

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    May 25, 2009

    I think that your sarcastic tone is unwarranted. I have read your original post carefully and it is unclear what you mean. You say "scales in thirds, triplets and 16ths". What does that mean? You write as if thirds, triplets and 16ths are all the same type of thing, when in fact they are three different categories of muscal object, namely an interval, a grouping of notes and a note duration.

    Anyway, there is a standard way to describe any piece of music (exercise or not) and that is to write it out using music notation - there would be no ambiguity if that was done.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2009
  9. derekkress

    derekkress Pianissimo User

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    Oct 8, 2007
    Montreal Qc Canada
    I believe I understand your question. It is very probable that we get a little more confused coming down, simply since we tend to always practice first in an upward pattern therefore more repetitions. It's like you hasn't mastered the Bflat concert scale by now. Maybe we should start with b concert instead. Be patient practice working down first then up, I'm sure over time all will be o.k.!
     
  10. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 3, 2006
    I've been a TM member for many years now. I'm pretty intuative when it comes to personality types. I can tell who the good teachers are, and who the argumentative egosentrics are. A good teacher isn't argumentative with their student. They are good listeners, and interpreters of meaning. As it pertains to this THREAD, I'm adding Veery 715 and drekkress to my list of good teachers. Thanks to you two again.

    crow
     

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