The Differece Between Passion and Expression

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trickg, Sep 13, 2005.

  1. rjzeller

    rjzeller Forte User

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    Funny, my wife's only question is typically, "When will you be home?"

    Hey CW -- does your band happen to have an arrangement for "Idaho"? I love that tune, but can't find it anywhere. And old Bassie classic, IMHO, but seems to not be very popular.
     
  2. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Talking about playing the same tunes over and over has been an interesting transition to the thread. Call me a geek too, but I enjoyed playing the old "standards" when I was in a big band - to me, they never got old.

    To continue on the subject, the drummer for the party band I play with has been getting very burned out as of late - he has even gone so far as to say that he hates pretty much every single tune we play. I've been doing some of the same tunes almost every gig for 4 years, and again, call me a geek, but I still dig them. We have a swing medly simply called "Big Band Medly", and we'll joke at the name and call it "Big BLAND Medly" but I still enjoy playing it.

    I wonder if the drummer's lack of passion has to do with the music that we play, or the scenery? He's been in the band even longer than I have, and maybe he's just burning out on playing weddings and other private party engagements. We've started to hear it and feel it in his playing too - it's amazing the effect that sort of thing can have on the ensemble. It isn't that he's playing bad because he isn't, but it lacks the fire that it used to have.

    I always said that when it ceased to be fun, i.e. I have lost my passion for it, then I would stop, but I don't see that day coming any time soon. :-)
     
  3. Solar Bell

    Solar Bell Moderator Staff Member

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    We have the Vic Schoen arrangement of Idaho.
    It is the one Benny Goodman used.
    Email me if you would like it. We'll see what we can do.

    -cw-
     
  4. Billy B

    Billy B Pianissimo User

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    CW,

    James, Dorsey, Goodman and Basie are the hip charts! Now when that two beat version of "All My Exes Are in Texas" is called, the real pain starts. :cry:
     
  5. tpter1

    tpter1 Forte User

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    Pat- You MUST be psychic. Or very odd coincidences are at play. We had a conversation on this very topic (expression and passion) today during a clarinet lesson with my HS clarinets. One of the kids said something about how it has to do with your attitude; if you come to band and don't really care, or are just lazy (her words were "...and are like" and she mimmicked slouching and made a lazy-looking face"it comes out".)

    This has been a very motivational topic for me; it is sparking some really cool discussion with my students.

    On the subject of "this is getting old", one of my first posts to Manny dealt with just that...how do you play something standard like Beethoven 5 AGAIN after having played it so many times and keep it fresh? His response was that he just absolutely loves his job; that he enjoys the music he plays. An article I have from college is an interview with Bud...it's title: "Man, alive what a KICK this is!" I don't know how many times either one played the Mahler 3...but Manny now has a new perspective (see the thread on his forum) and will be coming at it from a fresh angle this season. I've been in the classroom for 16 years; 13 of them in front of a band. I keep fresh much the same way; by taking classes during summers, trying new things (and sometimes failing). This thread is a prime example of that fresh perspective that re-ignites your fire as it has worked its way into my classroom as a subject of study, discussion and a direction to work in.

    I remember one concert where my HS jazz band was playing...we did Misty. (It was one of the MANY times we did it that year). There was this old man in the audience...he actually started to cry. It was he and his wife's song...we made him remember her. That was a POWERFUL moment for those kids.
     
  6. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Speaking of playing things that make people cry, many (most?) of us have played "Taps" a time or two. In my case, I have played it literally hundreds of times. THIS is a tune where it is necessary to continue to play it full of passion and expression.

    Does anyone here remember that scene out of Pulp Fiction where Samuel L. Jackson and John Travolta's characters were getting ready to go into the apartment with the young kids and Jackson's character makes a comment about needing to get into character? I got to where I had to approach "Taps" much the same way because of the fact that I had done it so many times. I had to really try to get into the perspective of the people who had lost thier loved one so that I could play "Taps" with passion and expression, do a good job, and help them to get through that time. If they weren't crying by the end of it, I failed in my rendition.

    No matter how many times I had played it, it was the one for those in attendance that really mattered.
     
  7. silverstar

    silverstar Mezzo Forte User

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    I just wanted to say that this is some great stuff!

    I can't wait to read the next posts about it.

    I'm still thinking about what I have to say.

    Lara
     
  8. Tootsall

    Tootsall Fortissimo User

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    Yee HAW!
    An area where you likely differ from most of us! ;-)
     
  9. tpter1

    tpter1 Forte User

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    Taps...this is TOTALLY unrelated, but I got a chuckle out of it:
    I was playing a show not too long ago...South Pacific. The director had decided to do a power point presentation before the overture showing names, newclippings and photos of those who gave the ultimate sacrifice during WW2 intermingled with popular songs from the era. At the end of the presentation, the 1st trumpet was supposed to play Taps. Immediately before, one of the songs was "Over There". Go ahead...think the melody for a moment...

    He looked at me after that and said ..."Oh crap...how does Taps go?" :shock: He played it beautifully and flawlessly on a cornet (as is usual for him!)
     
  10. old geezer

    old geezer Pianissimo User

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    our big band plays a lot of the standards [besides some new tunes] and we always feed off of the crowd. if they get excited as we play we play with a lot pizazz and if they seem dis-interested we just seem to play well but nothing exceptional. I notice this in my quintet also. we feed off of the audience. by the way I love the old standards and the audience always loves to hear tunes they recognise. old geezer Dave
     

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