The Difference between an expensive and a cheap trumpet

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trmpt_plyr, Aug 25, 2009.

  1. NickD

    NickD Forte User

    All the previous posts seems spot on. I only offer some grist for the mill.

    Nat Adderley played an Olds Ambassador cornet. If memory serves, it looked as though he was using the mouthpiece that came in the case! The Ambassador was their student line.

    SOME student model horns are excellent AND built kid tough. This is usually the case, though.

    Nick
     
  2. RAK

    RAK Piano User

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    I never owned a Bach. I checked there site and they look nice. Even if There not custom made then their quality is really good.
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    You are wrong. Pro trumpets are not more musical. Players are musical. the trumpet is just brass.

    A good student horn is rugged, reliable, easy to play.
    A pro horn is optimized for sound and is often not as rugged or easy to play. A pro horn will be able to be played much more loudly before the sound gets nasty. The difference in cost is based on the amount of TLC in putting it together. Student horns are maschine made and pro horns are hand made. Good student horns are basically clones of the prototype. Pro horns all have a life of their own.

    Weak players with weak chops and breathing get along with a student horn much better than a pro model. They are much less work to play and put up with less maintenance.
     
  4. dhbailey

    dhbailey Piano User

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    "Custom Made" used to mean that something was built to a customer's specifications -- the customer would specify a certain lead-pipe, certain bell, certain tuning slide configuration, whatever. The customer would order that all, the order would be placed in the queue and whenever the manufacturer got around to making that specific instrument, it would be shipped to the customer.

    These days it's just a word that manufacturers use to jack up the price and make people think that an instrument is more specially made. Sometimes it is, sometimes it's not.

    Most Bachs are assembly-line instruments, built by skilled craftspeople who care, but still it's "get 'em made as fast (and good) as possible and ship them out the door."

    It's really only the high-priced hand-made instruments like Shires, Eclipse, Hub van Laar, that can be said to be truly custom made.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2009
  5. RAK

    RAK Piano User

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    Why if a customer ordered a trumpet that he made it custom then he sells it on eBay it's still custom?

    So you saying the Getzen custom serious isn't custom at all?
     
  6. dhbailey

    dhbailey Piano User

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    If you can walk into a showroom and ask to try out some Getzen Custom trumpets, then they're not custom made at all -- they're just a different model line with the "custom" name. A custom horn is built to one individual's specifications, which means that the customer has to place the order after having spent time deciding which design features he/she wants on the instrument, then the order is sent to the factory and that single instrument is assembled and then shipped.

    Manufacturers are abusing all the old terms -- Those "Bach" student trumpets are really "Bundy" trumpets with a flashy name. But calling them "Bach" merely cheapens the Bach brand, it doesn't elevate the Bundy trumpet to any sort of new plateau. Look at a lot of the Cadillac model cars -- they're simpy Oldsmobiles with a different logo and much higher price tag.

    Calling a line of pre-made trumpets "Custom" simply means that the term "custom made" has no meaning anymore.

    If a person buys a pre-made Getzen then alters it, it becomes "customized" and that is how it should be advertised when sold on e-bay. It isn't a "custom built Getzen" which implies that the people at the Getzen factory made it as a one-off instrument to that customer's specifications.
     
  7. trmpt_plyr

    trmpt_plyr Pianissimo User

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    What I meant when I said that pro trumpets are more musical is that when I played on a student trumpet, the tone was very straight and emotionless, like emotionless air going through a hard tube instead of anything close to musical. The pro ones sound more musical, and not like emotionless air vibrating a metal tube emotionlessly.
     
  8. dhbailey

    dhbailey Piano User

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    The pro models have a lot more care and time put into R&D to find the best locations for bracing as well as the best alloys to make the horn really sing. Student models have braces placed where they can be installed the easiest and the alloys that are used are less expensive than those used on pro-horns.

    With that said, however, within the student instrument category, there are more musical and less musical models -- the Yamaha is a very musical student model trumpet, as are all the wonderful Olds Ambassadors from the days when Olds was a real company. The King 601 and 602 played very nicely also, in my opinion.
     
  9. Mamba21500

    Mamba21500 Piano User

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    Most of the time when it says custom before an instrument, it either means that it's a heavy horn, or a light one. Aka, Taylor Chicago custom, production horn, heavy instrument. Yamaha bobby shew custom, very light.
     

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