The different sounds from a trumpet

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Saile, May 12, 2011.

  1. Saile

    Saile Piano User

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    So you always hear about that "vintage" sound you get from old trumpets. I have an idea where they are coming from. But what makes it have that "vintage" sound?

    I bought a Besson Stratford off the net, based on the information i gathered from it, prob was made in the 60s... Comparing it to my other new asian horn, it has a slight "darker" sound to it. You notice it most when you play higher notes.
     
  2. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    The care that was taken by the craftsmen "back in the day". Saying that, not all vintage horns are good horns. Some are outright dogs with fleas and ticks.
     
  3. Saile

    Saile Piano User

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    what makes a good horn then?
     
  4. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    A "vintage" sound is meant to describe the sound concepts that were around in the past. I have trumpets from the 60's and 70's, but they don't really sound all that differrent than most trumpets today (just better, IMO).

    I have one trumpet from 1924 (Martin Handcraft) that really does have a "vintage" sound. The concepts that they were using in the 20's relate to the big bands and other activity of the day ........... However, I have no idea how to describe the sound. It's a Martin, but it's not extremely dark, nor bright, just different. Vintage.:-):dontknow:

    Turtle
     
  5. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    That's the million dollar question! It depends on what you are using it for. Do you want to play lead in a big band? Then you need a horn that can cut through the rest of the band so you're looking for a more brilliant tone. If you're in a concert style setting, a lead horn won't blend well so it won't fit there. Brand name horns with a good rep is where you should start. I will let you do that research (I don't want to forget a brand and offend anyone). Mechanically, you want a horn with a good fit and finish; are the valves responsive and fast, do all the slides work well, does the horn play in tune with itself. These are just some things that make a good horn. Oh, and it has to be silver!:roll:
     
  6. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Or nickel plated!:lol:

    It's not as bright and shiny as silver, but oh so much easier to keep clean. Of course it should be copper plated under the nickel plating, for the best sound concept (38b:thumbsup:).

    Turtle
     
  7. Saile

    Saile Piano User

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    these are good points.

    It can come down to "you get what you pay for"
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Many of those who TALK about a vintage sound only have a WEAK sound. I do not consider a Martin Committee or Olds Super to be any more "vintage" than a Bach 37 sound (think about how long that horn has been around.....).

    It is easy to "feel" special when having an older horn. Vintage only has to do with the physical age.

    A similar agument came up a while back with the baroque or natural trumpet. Many current instruments have vents (3 or 4 holes) to help tune them more easily. As it turns out, that is a new invention that has nothing to do with the clarino.

    The same here: our "sound" is not vintage with a specific horn. It is determined by OUR brains, ears and talent. Our ability to listen and FIT in ensembles makes us TIMELESS. All this blah about "vintage" only succeeds in increasing prices for OLD horns.

    Now collecting instruments is another thing altogether!
     
  9. Saile

    Saile Piano User

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    So you are saying the vintage soubd comes from what you prouce or make of it?
     
  10. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    I asked someone how a horn played and they told me it has a vintage sound. When I asked.. what does that mean. orchestra? They replied "vintage".. what????
    My gut said it means they don't resonate like the newer horns do... overtones are not as rich .. but I DO NOT really know ,,, that is just what the term conveys to me.
    It's a nice term for a not so vibrant horn ... but I could be wrong and will admit it ... at least I found out I am not alone in wondering what that means. So thank you for pointing out that the Emporer has no clothes on.
     

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