The different sounds from a trumpet

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Saile, May 12, 2011.

  1. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

    16,412
    7,536
    Dec 22, 2008
    Virginia
    I think "vintage sound" is as much a marketing tool now aimed at collectors as anything else (along with the term "minty" ;-)). I own a Conn 40B that is a good lead horn. It is from 1934, so it is definitely vintage but could be used today. I also own a Boston Chas. E George Vega that was a decent horn in it's day. It has a very tinny sound and really can't be used in anything but a band from that period. Both are "peashooters" in appearance and vintage/old.
     
  2. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

    5,065
    1,005
    Jun 6, 2010
    Oregon

    Good way to kill the conversation .... :dontknow:

    And, btw, everyone likes to feel special .... for some, it takes knowing all the "facts" to feel special.

    Turtle
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2011
  3. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

    16,412
    7,536
    Dec 22, 2008
    Virginia
    He can only kill it if we let him! :lol:
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,613
    7,957
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    I thought we would get a killer definition what "vintage" sound is!

    In any case, the "traditional" Bach sound popular in big orchestras today is every bit as vintage as what most "vintage" horns from ebay have.

    I am not sure how to classify a peeshooter. That was not the "established" sound to have during any period. It probably was marketing from bygone years.

    Vintage to me is the hysterically correct performance practices with natural trumpets without holes, cornetti, a keyed trumpet for the Haydn or Hummel or a deep F trumpet in the orchestra.

    Other than that, Wilmer Wise will smile when I mention the vintage vibrato of the Nadia Boulanger school of singing................
     
  5. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

    16,412
    7,536
    Dec 22, 2008
    Virginia
    I classify a "peashooter" as a very tightly wrapped elongated trumpet that won't fit in a modern case. A "peeshooter" sounds like a euphemistic term relating to male anatomy sometimes used in "voiding contests"(or maybe it was a spelling error?)!;-)
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2011
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,613
    7,957
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    :evil:
     
  7. richtom

    richtom Forte User

    Age:
    67
    1,538
    1,273
    Dec 7, 2003
    For the most part, "vintage" instruments - especially mediocre ones - seem to be far more popular with amateurs than with pros.
    To be sure, some pros do use vintage horns to their advantage, but the pros I know use modern up-to-date horns simply because the horn allows the player greater flexibility in performance without having to overcome some built in characteristic from days gone by.
    This may rile some folks up, but I always find it interesting when a poster lists a closet full of old, not so hot horns in their signature. I think that maybe if they sold them, donated them, or made lamps out of the majority of them and bought one or two high quality pro horns, their playing might be more enjoyable and far less work.
    Rich T.
     
  8. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,793
    3,558
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    I agree with this 100%
     
  9. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

    3,724
    758
    Nov 5, 2003
    Rochester, MN
    Rich,

    I agree, in *general* most old horns can't compete with new horns, particularly the top end models. However, there are some obvious exceptions. Since I recently bought a 50's vintage Conn 10A cornet I can say with confidence that there isn't a new horn even close to it on the market today. Its a totally unique horn that can do things no modern cornet or trumpet can do. Of course, whether that is desirable is a matter of taste.

    And I am sure there are other "oddities" like this out there in the vintage market that are unmatched by today's horns.

    But it is true, that by today's standard of a high end trumpet there are only a handful of
    old horns that can come close despite what their fans say. I've played some old Bach's, Benge's, and Olds that were raved over by their owners and they are OK, but not for me.

    Trumpet designs keep improving and assuming that the best designs are vintage doesn't
    jibe with what I see.

    Greg
     
  10. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

    3,724
    758
    Nov 5, 2003
    Rochester, MN
    Oh and about that vintage sound stuff, yeah, its mostly BS.

    Trumpets have to follow the laws of physics. If you have a vintage horn with a given
    bore, leadpipe taper and bell flare its going to sound pretty much like a new horn with the same dimensions. There's no magic that happens with age.
     

Share This Page