The different sounds from a trumpet

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Saile, May 12, 2011.

  1. johnny ray

    johnny ray Pianissimo User

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    Nothing more needs to be said...you are exactly right, and the simple math and physics that applies to trumpet design has not changed. A reevaluation of Newton or Einstein is not needed and has not been done in order to make "better" modern horns. I would just add material properties to your list of design factors.

    JR
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Actually, Monette, Harrelson, Yamaha and certain other companies have "reinvented" the sound and resonant behaviour of the trumpet. That does not mean that everyone wants to go there however. Grab a Xeno, Prana or a Bravura and you will immediately notice the DIFFERENCE.
     
  3. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    A vintage pro sound is (for me) an affordable sound. Where can you get a modern horn that performs as well as the Severinsen or the Connstellation for (an average cost of) $425? You'll end up with something that an Ambassador would put to shame. I make up for the savings by going ultra modern on mps (Prana), which tend to cost more than my trumpets.

    And for those who automatically think that modern horns are more "advanced" and make up for the "deficiencies" of vintage trumpets .... Where did you study your physics???

    Turtle
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2011
  4. johnny ray

    johnny ray Pianissimo User

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    I would love to grab one of those. Maybe someday I will be able to. I think I have enough, (do I dare say?) "vintage" horns, and I love them all. I am someone who played trumpet during my teen age years and then stopped after high school. Now, 30+ years later, I have fallen in love with the trumpet and with playing the trumpet. I've been coming back now for not quite two years, and during that time have collected the older horns that I have. When my budget can afford it, I would love to try out some of the modern trumpets you have mentioned and add one or two of them to my little collection.

    Regards,
    JR
     
  5. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Can you tell us what some of these "built in characteristics from days gone by" (that modern pros don't want to have to "overcome".) are???? I would love to know how much harder I'm working with my old instruments.:lol:

    Turtle
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Bad intonation causing use of alternate fingerings? Lower center pitch (A438)? Freedom of choice? Less tight valves? Less consistency due to more manual labor(of love)? Prettier engraving? Thicker metal? Less marketing hype? Wooden cases? Real mother of pearl finger buttons? Spit instead of valve oil? (Too)Long first valve slides and no hook?
     
  7. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Well, there went my last purchase in an attempt to have a piece of vintage history-gold plate.
    [​IMG]

    It does fit the "doesn't fit in a modern case" definition however. Is this what they call a peashooter with tight wrap? Horn does have a different sound though it is hard to explain. Plays best when you ease off and do not push it. Bought it from a pro who was using it for be bop.

    Just curious why you suggest most are silver? None of my oldser horns are silver: Supers, Recording, or Ambassador. Seems like from pictures, most of the early horns were lacquer.
     
  8. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Answering Rowuk's post above:


    Those are negatives???

    No bad intonation on my horns going back to 1924.
    No lower pitch.
    No freedom of choice but freedom of wallet.
    Smooth valves.
    How about NO engraving on most modern horns (too expensive).
    No marketing hype because the companies are no longer in business.
    I like my wooden cases.
    MOP rocks and feels good on the fingers.
    No hook means one less thing to think about ...... everyone should learn how to lip down their notes.

    That's it??????:lol:

    Turtle
     
  9. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Gzent's comments about modern horns being better are interesting. While loving my older horns (as you can see from signature), when it comes to very serious playing, I always reach for one of my newer Kanstuls. They seem to play easier, and the sound is different.

    It is really difficult to describe the tone differences in the horns. This seems to be an area for which we simply don't have adequate words in the English language. To me, Olds Supers are like a garden hose on jet. The Recording is the same but hooked to a fire hydrant. Bach Strads are like a hose on full. The Holton pictured above is a mist setting. My Kanstuls are on sprinkle. Those analogies are tone to water spray width, intensity, and drop size.
     
  10. Saile

    Saile Piano User

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    What horn is that? Looks really nice
     

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