The different sounds from a trumpet

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Saile, May 12, 2011.

  1. kcmt01

    kcmt01 Mezzo Forte User

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    Well, first of all, the term "vintage" most likely means different things to different people. Nowadays, it seems to be mostly a selling gimmick; a buzz word. That being said, my own definition would be most of the horns built before around 1940, when the big band era really took off. My 1952 Revelation sounds to me like a modern horn. The 1930 Llewellyn is much more subtle. Both sound great, and both are easier to play in the higher register than the Bach. As far as the first slide saddle, I just don't miss it. I learned on the Getzen, which didn't have the saddle, so I just bend the notes into tune by habit.
     
  2. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    I'll take gold too! The silver reference was an inside joke sort of with turtle (thus the rolling eyes). That looks like a pretty normal horn too me. "Peashooters" are clearly longer than what we call normal length for a trumpet. Their heyday ended in the '30's. They take getting used to with the tight wrap. You have to jam you left hand in there and find what is most comfortable. Best example I can think of is to compare a Conn 40B with a Conn 48B. Similar bore at .459, and .458, both Vocabells (beadless rim).
    40B
    http://www.xs4all.nl/~cderksen/Conn40B1932image.html
    48B
    http://www.xs4all.nl/~cderksen/Conn40B1932image.html

    Both are heavy horns to hold. The 48 replaced the 40.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2011
  3. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Saile, Lou,
    It is a 1924 Holton. Has LF on leadpipe to indicate it tunes to the new, lower pitch (modern in that day), and not the old turn of the century pitches. Also has an adapter to change from Bb to A. It is in good shape, no dinks, with a little wear on the gold. It IS over an inch longer than my Kanstuls so I am wondering if it is what you guys call a pea shooter. While it does not have a model name, several indicated it looks like a Revelation-before they were called a Revelation. Would love to hear what someone thought was a realistic price on it. Still not sure I didn't overpay-spur of the moment buy which is never good. I'm a "like good deals" guy.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2011
  4. Saile

    Saile Piano User

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    Nov 11, 2010
    Thats a nice horn and it looks like i t has been kept in good condition!

    I think when they say "vintage" it mostly refers to the age of the trumpet. I guess the age does sorta impact on the sound, but i think it most comes from what you can produce and your tone.

    I have only been playing for 5 months, so i don't know much and i could be wrong.

    I attempted to get that "vintage" tone by buying a 1960s Besson Stratford.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I found that it does sound a little "darker" than my other modern trumpet. Although i wouldn't say its HIGHLY noticeable. I do however struggle playing some of the higher notes on it than i do with my modern one, i believe this gives it that more darker sound to it.
    On the other hand, it looks good, if that the look you want, and its better than my modern one in my opinion.

    It comes down i guess to what you can produce out of it, im trying to achieve that vintage tone.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2011
  5. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Neat horn Saile. I always liked the forward angled 2nd valve slide. In fact, I have a Kanstul Chicago that also has it. If you are unfamiliar with Kanstul, he was the guy at Olds when many of their horns were top notch-then went to Benge where the same occurred. He bought out the Benge shop when Benge died and now makes some of the best horns in the business. Long story - his Kanstul Chicago (now called 1000 and 1001 depending on bore) is a great horn -about as close to the original as you can get. Also, back in his day, Benge was trying to copy (with his own modifications) the classic French Besson.
     
  6. Saile

    Saile Piano User

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    ah ok i haven't heard of that brand.

    My dream horn is a Martin Committee, but man, they are so expensive
     
  7. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Committees are nice horns. If you like vintage, you really ought to check out what Kanstul is doing. He is making modern day horns-but many of the models are very similar to some of the old "nothing is better" ones. They aren't really clones -but built around the idea of the older horns -but with improvements. He has a Kanstul 1537 (his take of the Bach Strad with 37 bell), the Kanstul 1502 (Callichio), the 609 (Olds Ambassador), the 991 (Conn Constellation) what I am now playing as my main horn -and many others. While I enjoy the older horns (as you can see from signature), it is tough to beat a new "similar but improved" horn.
     
  8. Saile

    Saile Piano User

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    i did have a quick look. They seem good. Not so cheap either, some of them go up to $3000! With that money, you can get a Martin Committee - which is a dream horn for me
     
  9. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    Vintage sound has lots of ticks and scratches mixed in. The vinyl records which brought that sound to us were prone to damage.
    The closest I have come to it is to play with an undamped snare drum nearby, someone sweeping the floor and maybe a blender running in the kitchen.
     
    turtlejimmy and tobylou8 like this.

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