The doors he opened...

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by amtrpt, Feb 27, 2008.

  1. treehuggerx13

    treehuggerx13 New Friend

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    Jul 30, 2009
    I love all these stories and I hope that that will one day happen to my friends and I.
     
  2. Ellsworth

    Ellsworth New Friend

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    Apr 19, 2009
    Toronto
    Jack Pinto was my teacher at the University of Miami, along with Harry Glantz. Jack was instrumental in forming my career. You say that he's deceased. When and where?

    Thanks,
    Ace
     
  3. Phil986

    Phil986 Forte User

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    Nov 16, 2009
    Near Portland, OR.
    That one be instrumental in forming a music career is definitely to be commended, and perhaps better than being vocal...

    However, these voices have long resonated away from the intertubes: the last post before yours was over 19 months ago, the OP is much older.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2011
  4. siarr

    siarr Pianissimo User

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    May 18, 2007
    Hollywood, FL, USA
    I studied with Jack as a young teenager here in South Florida. We also did a lot of gigs together in various orchestras. He was first trumpet in the U of Miami symphony during those years, and I was at that time mainly a percussionist who also played trumpet. Once I left town to go to Juilliard I traveled around and lost touch with Jack. I don't know exactly when he died, but it was probably ten years or more ago. I assume he was still here in south Florida, but again, I don't know for sure. He was a fine player and a really great guy. I miss him.

    Best wishes,
    Chas Reskin
     
  5. Ellsworth

    Ellsworth New Friend

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    Apr 19, 2009
    Toronto
    As I said, I studied with Jack at the University of Miami. I also played with him in the Miami Phiharmonic and the house band at the Carillon on the Beach. Jack was a great guy, but he didn't suffer fools gladly. After a run-in with Frederick Fennell, the head of the performance department, he left the U of M. I was assigned another teacher. What that teacher didn't know was that I continued to study privately with Jack. In graduate school, I studied with Harry Glantz, Toscanini's trumpeter, who had recently retired from playing. Again, I continued to study privately with Jack. I learned more from him than any teacher I've had before or since. Many fine trumpet players went through his studio, including Carol Dawn Reinhart. Carol was studying with him at the same time that I was. She was (probably still is) one of the best trumpet players I've ever heard. She was also a violin virtuoso and drop-dead gorgeous. In addition to her legit gigs, she appeared many times on Al Hirt's TV show, the Tonight Show and the Mike Douglas show, And every time she came back to Miami, she had a lesson with Jack. BTW, Carol is now Head of the Department of Wind and Percussion Instruments at the University of Music in Vienna, Austria.
     
  6. BrotherBACH

    BrotherBACH Piano User

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    Oct 5, 2010
    I did not have any music or trumpet teachers that opened doors for me per se. I just asked if I could play the trumpet like Al Hirt (my hero at the time) and my parents said you can do anything you want to in life. They got me a Bach Strad when they had no money. I took lessons through my grade school and when I progressed rapidly, I was taken to the local teachers college to take lessons with the first trumpet in that program (Concordia University in River Forest, Illinois).

    For some reason, I got scared about a profession in music and let it go shortly after the start of high school. Thirty years later, I have picked it up again. I recently went to visit my parents and brought my trumpet. At night, I asked them if I could practice in the basement before going to bed. I warned them that it might sound painful, especially the Schmidt Directional Long Tone Exercise. My mother said, "Don't worry about doing long tones, mothers are different than wives. We are just happy to hear you playing again." My dad just said, "I miss those days when I could tell how you felt by listening to you play; just go downstairs and practice."

    No, I don't think I had a great musical experience like some of you. I am just lucky enough in this life to have had the most supportive parents ever. The stories in this thread have moved me very deeply, to think of them tonight.

    BrotherBACH
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2011
  7. siarr

    siarr Pianissimo User

    Age:
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    May 18, 2007
    Hollywood, FL, USA
    Small world! I also knew Carole Reinhart, first from U of M, where she was in the section with Pinto and Alan Hoel, then at Juilliard (1964), where she played in the orchestra under Jean Morel. She was indeed beautiful, and a superb trumpeter. Somehow she was briefly married to Chuck Winfield, who was the 2nd trumpet in BS&T, but that ended quickly and she was off to Germany and spent most of her career there. As I recall, Jack was also the very first Schilke dealer in Miami. I learned a great deal performing with that orchestra, which was at that time directed by Fabien Sevitzky, Kousevitzky's nephew. I could say a lot about him, but I'll spare you!;-)

    Best,
    Chas Reskin
     
  8. Ellsworth

    Ellsworth New Friend

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    Apr 19, 2009
    Toronto
    Yes, Jack was the first and for a long time only Schilke dealer in South Florida. I bought a B3 from him. It's still my main horn and is in great shape. I use my Bach Mount Vernon as a backup.

    I have fond memories of Jack and of Carol. She was several years ahead of me at the U of M, and she was always very nice to me and very encouraging. She's now married to a very nice Austrian chap, and they have grandkids.

    I too have memories of Fabian Sevitsky. My girlfriend (later my wife) played oboe and English horn in the orchestra. She and her parents were close friends of Fabian and his wife (an incredible harp virtuoso), and we went to many parties at their house. He would greet his guests with two glasses of vodka, link arms and both he and the guest would chug the vodka. Oddly enough, as Fanian became more intoxicated, his Russian accent seemed to go away. By the time it was nearly gone, we knew that he was barely conscious. He died of a heart attack while on tour in Greece. His wife was in Miami at the time, and she nearly went crazy when it appeared that the Athens police had no idea where his body was. A very sad end for a fine musician.
     

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