The mental side of trumpet playing

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by chenzo, May 1, 2012.

  1. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Oh Great! Put me out of my day job... and just when I was trying to rope Rowuk into therapy!
     
  2. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    All else aside, when I'm about to practice/perform my attitude is "make do". Won't say such always results in my best, but I realize that I have mental ups and downs from day to day. Just hope you are listening on one of my "up" days. Now break time is over and I'll continue practicing.
     
  3. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    uhm -- everybody including all of the great trumpet players had good days and bad days -- (Al Hirt, Chuck Mangione, Louie Armstrong, etc., etc.) -- I mean someone tell me if they know ANYBODY who plays a musical instrument -- that they NEVER had an off day!!!!!!! -- but what do they do about it!!!! get over it, and go on with it and try to make those days --- less and less frequent!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  4. the newbie

    the newbie Pianissimo User

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    Is this why so many great musicians were junkies?

    Or alcoholics?
     
  5. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    I AM NOT - I just get ....... thirsty ........ a lot.


    Oh? You mean the OTHER great musicians - sorry.
     
  6. EdMann

    EdMann Mezzo Forte User

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    deleted
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2012
  7. EdMann

    EdMann Mezzo Forte User

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    There's a wonderful article about Judith Sexton in this month's AFM Musician magazine in which she recounts a day at a relatively difficult miniature golf course where she nails over half of the course in hole-in-ones. She's never had any training in golf and attributes this feat to mental imagery. Says she, "Your brain does not distinguish a difference between doing an action and imagining it." I wholeheartedly believe this. Overwhelmingly, her students come to her with tension issues, worry issues. She alleviates them of their burden.

    The OP is letting us in on his personality by mentioning how his mind gets in the way negatively. I believe it SHOULD get in the way, positively. Just the other day I was called to do a rare lead gig with some older players, players who've heard a lot of lead players. I didn't care. They can have their own thoughts. I strolled in, picked up the book and thought about Judith there in Chicago slamming balls on the mini course. Did just fine. Like the song says, Pure Imagination.

    ed
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    One of the drummer I play with is Mark Lomax. He states the following motivational concept... Play the song as if it will be the last song you will ever play. That one works for me.
     
  9. patkins

    patkins Forte User

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    No, this is a total misconception. Substance abuse is not specific to musicians. It is rampant in society to all persons, in all classes, at all ages,and of all intellectual levels at an equal prevelance. It is not a respector of persons. I call it the Equal Opportunity Exploiter disease. At the very basic it is a lack of the concept of a higher power. Substance abusers are often undiagnosed persons with mental illness, or people with mental illness who are self-medicating.
    It is an unfortunate consequence of the sixties decade that encouraged experimenting. However, many great professionals today are not substance abusers. Those who have quit the pattern, continue in successful careers.
     
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Despite all of this, when substance abuse was factored in as a confounding variable in the BMJ journal publication looking at why life expectance is so markedly decreased in sax players compared to all other musicians, substance use WAS FOUND NOT TO BE A CONTRIBUTING FACTOR to mortality. All I can say to that is:
    Cheers!

    Must run off, got a medicine consultant on a patient in the psych ward!
     

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