the music business is collapsing

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by mike ansberry, May 24, 2005.

  1. DaveH

    DaveH Piano User

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    Nov 27, 2003
    I don't play professionally nowadays, but I seem to think that the DJ has gone a long way to reduce the opportunities for live music.

    Years ago, I played lots of gigs here locally - metropolitan area of Northeast Ohio. Over a period of years, I played both night club and one nighter (party, dance, wedding, reunion, reception, etc) types of gigs.

    A lot of that work has disappeared to the DJ. At least so it seems in this part of "the world."
     
  2. Billy B

    Billy B Pianissimo User

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    Nov 5, 2004
    Des Moines, IA
    The DJ has hurt us a lot. Touring shows are using more electronics, fewer musicians. The question is, how long will the public put up with sub par music? Music educators are more important than ever in developing appreciation of live music. Pros need to put in some time in the schools, even if it is free, to help build an audience.
     
  3. JohnnyV

    JohnnyV New Friend

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    May 6, 2005
    Durant, OK
    Not technology...

    I really think that the Beatles killed music, sure they had some great tunes, but they capitalized on the small guitar quartert and became THE MOST POPULAR BAND OF ALL TIME...their music took the musicianship out of music, making any kid witha $50 guitar and an hour of pratice to be considered a "player." Think of it this way: 1. your instrument is cheap; 2. you never have to read music; ........!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!??!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!!?!?!?!??!!?!?!?AAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Besides, everyone else followed them.

    But I have to admit, I am a beatles fan and they did use some wind overdubs, but whats' even worse is rap, synthizsized drum beats set behind a garble of talking, indeed, it is a sad time in music.

    Some good things that have happened: 1. Satchmo was one of the few (if not the only) musicians to actually surpass the Beatles on the billboard charts, for (Hello, Dolly); 2. some of that 80's "hair" metal was actually inspired by BACH!!!!!(Y.J.Malmsteen)

    But I do find that people intrested in Jazz are somewhat common, but full out symphonic fans are extremely rare, speaking from a small Oklahoma town with no symphony(just high school and college bands).

    Me, I play trumpet, I am proud; but I also play guitar :twisted: , in a Jazz idiom, and I am proud...

    It boils down to this: the public's opinion of what popular music should be is what has really killed the demand for live music, especially us wind players..................................

    (I didn't really try to push thoughts in this reply in any direction really, just presented something to ponder on and waste time on for another few moments before I go to bed)
     
  4. GordonH

    GordonH Mezzo Forte User

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    May 15, 2005
    Scotland
    We have government support for the arts here in the UK.

    Here is one of the results:

    http://www.sussex.ac.uk/Units/arthist/sharp/issues/0002/pHTML/pTraceyEminMyBed01.shtml

    Most of our orchestras are subsidised because we do not have the philanthropic heritage the US has.

    There are probably too many orchestras here but when they tried to merge the opera and ballet orchestras there was a huge outcry by the union, even though both companies share the same production facilities and venues.

    We have the RSNO, BBC SSO and SCO as full time entities and we only have 5 major cities. Plus we have all the rouring orchestras, the ballet and opera ones plus severl very good semi pro light orchestras.
    There is no shortage and i am surprised at the large sizes of the audiences.
    We also have the Edinburgh Festival so we get to see lots of well known orchestras. I have seen the Berlin Phil play here.
     
  5. GordonH

    GordonH Mezzo Forte User

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    May 15, 2005
    Scotland
  6. Mikey

    Mikey Forte User

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    Oct 24, 2003
    An Arts subsidy is fine and dandy, but then you will have to explain to all the "No New Taxes" people in the USA why half their paychecks just went to pay taxes.

    Same with "Universal Health Coverage." The money has to come from somewhere, and the easiest way for the Goverment to do that is to raise taxes.
     
  7. bandman

    bandman Forte User

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    Oct 16, 2004
    Lafayette, LA, USA
    I also find that the arts in general are going the WRONG way. I live near New Orleans where I have seen major changes in the way musicians are treated since the 1970's.

    When I first moved here there was jazz club after jazz club, and plenty of opportunities to play. There are still a few, and those of us who have been around for a long time can still find work, but there is less and less for the new guys.

    I just worry about what it will be like in another 30 years. In my eyes it doesn't look good :?:
     
  8. DaveH

    DaveH Piano User

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    Nov 27, 2003
    I agree with you, and would comment if such are the conditions in and around New Orleans - a major music center for years and years - you can probably imagine things are much worse elsewhere where there is far less in the way of music and performing traditions and environments.
     
  9. Billy B

    Billy B Pianissimo User

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    Nov 5, 2004
    Des Moines, IA
    It is popular at this time to shun cultural aspects of our society. Our elected leaders as well as other societal role models do not appreciate art, literature, music or theatre. I was at a Tom Harrell/Charles Macpherson concert last night. When the children of the 60's die off, I am not sure there will be enough audience to fill the auditorium. I truly believe we are seeing the effects of what Steve Allen coined as the dumbing down of America. In speaking with the parents of students, I have seen a distinct difference in the attidudes towards the arts in people who entered college pre 1980 and post 1980, or there abouts. It simply takes too much effort, too much thinking, and too much giving of yourself to listen to a concert such as this. My totally non-misician, accountant wife loved the concert, so it isn't a question of having to understand the music to enjoy it. And yes, for all you conspiracy theory people out there, I think the dumbing down is deliberate. A non-thinking society is much easier to control. It is up to every individual musician to reach out and touch the lives of young people to educate them to the value of the arts, or we will lose it all.
     
  10. The Green Dolphin

    The Green Dolphin New Friend

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    Oct 4, 2004
    northern Wisconsin
    I agree that there is a dumbing down in our society. But don't you think that the reasons for this are inherent in where our society is now, as opposed to fifty or sixty years ago? That people, because of television and the internet are becoming less willing to get out in a larger social setting? That people, because of television and internet, are becoming somehow more "passive?"
     

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