The Pressure!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by barato, May 23, 2007.

  1. barato

    barato New Friend

    35
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    Jan 17, 2007
    Somewhere in Ohio
    I just gotten braces on about 4 months ago. I am surviving with them so far! Or am I? I have improved in my sight reading and such, but the problem for higher register is pressure! I have too much pressure on my upper lip and I am almost going to burst in frustration! I am working through it all, practicing each day, but I can not figure out how to relieve the pressure. It could be that I am pressing back to hard with the mouthpiece or I am creating to much pressure when leading up to the higher register. It is painful just to hit a high B, the first one above the staff! In other words pathetically low because of the pressure. My tone is not affected, but actually sounds better then before, but the pressure is still killing me. Any tips or suggestions to help me get around my problem?
     
  2. stchasking

    stchasking Forte User

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    Jun 11, 2006
    A b above the staff is ok. Did you get a chance to read your private messages? I think you can progress over the summer if you work the Earl Irons book. Try the teflon tape method over the short term. Your lips should glide over the teflon tape.

    This summer try to work the Irons book 3 or 4 times a day with some hours in between. Slow and steady. Don't work ahead until you make real progress.

    Thousands of students have been through what you are doing. You can work it out.

    I see you are in Ohio. Look up James Olcott in Bowling Green. Get a lesson from him. There are plenty of good teachers in Ohio to help you.
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2007
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    Barato,
    excellent advice from STCHASKING!

    There are many factors that create a NEED for pressure, the most common one that I have seen is a large or deep mouthpiece WITHOUT the corresponding breath control and embouchure strength! This is NOT a recommendation to switch mouthpieces, it is only an explanation of a very common combination that causes problems!
    The Irons book is also the one that I personally use. I would also recommend buzzing the exercises as cleanly as possible on the mouthpiece first and then playing them on the horn. This tends to strengthen the "corner" muscles adding strength to the embouchure. Rest between every single exercise. If you notice tension in the throat area, take a sip of tap water before playing - that seems to relax me.
    There is no overnight solution. Diligence and a methodical system will get you to where you want to be.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2007
  4. barato

    barato New Friend

    35
    0
    Jan 17, 2007
    Somewhere in Ohio
    I have been working with the Schlossberg method and that is about it, for my trumpet director (the one I am getting lessons from) said that should be good enough. In case your wondering my trumpet director may not be a big famous trumpet player (name is Tony Esposito) but he is one of the best in my area. I like your advice and I will try to get the Iron book when I buy the Arbans book I always wanted. I am still a high school student so I will have to talk my parents into driving over to Bowling Green (i am in northeast Ohio) and paying for a lesson or me paying for the lesson. Once again thanks for the advice and thanks for posting. Happy Playing:whistle:
     
  5. Billy B

    Billy B Pianissimo User

    212
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    Nov 5, 2004
    Des Moines, IA
    How braces affect the trumpet player is different for each player. Sometimes a different rim size or shape will place the pressure point in a more friendly area. Covering the sharp edges of the braces can help, either with teflon plumber's tape or the Morgan Bumpers. https://www.morganbumper.com/index1.html
    The one thing that practically all players with braces have in common is that their mental focus changes from the sound to the feel. I would concentrate on playing lots of lyrical etudes in the middle range such as Getchell and Concone. Placing the bell under about a half inch of water while playing long tones can help make you aware of steady, relaxed breath.
     
  6. thelazytrumpeter

    thelazytrumpeter New Friend

    10
    1
    Aug 6, 2006
    I used that morgan bumber cover when i had braces and it made my playing feel the same as it was before i had braces. Very comfortable and just an amazing product. Matt
     

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