The Promenade and the quick breath

Discussion in 'Orchestra / Solo / Chamber Music' started by sdgtpt, Apr 25, 2005.

  1. sdgtpt

    sdgtpt New Friend

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    Dec 3, 2004
    I just had an idea that was real helpful.... but a challenge.... I hope someone will reply with other ideas to spark some more creative practice...

    I was practicing the promenade in pictures working to extend the last note of the phrase and shorten the breath as well...

    here is what I came up with....

    subdivide the excerpt into sixteenth notes (at a medium tempo). when you arrive at the last note of the phrase play the first three sixteenth notes and take the breath on the last one....

    hard...
     
  2. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Nice!

    I made one adjustment and that was to only play 16ths on the last beat of the phrase to maintain the lyrical quality of the phrase. However, the 16ths throughout is a wonderful idea because you have to play with a buttery tongue and a constant airflow in order for it to sound beautiful. The 16ths throughout also keeps the 8ths from rushing.

    Bravo! That sucker's hard!

    ML
     
  3. Tarter_trpt8

    Tarter_trpt8 Pianissimo User

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    Jan 17, 2005
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    In the Promenade do you play the notes legato or with a pop to the notes...I'm asking in regards to the use of "buttery" in your last post...

    Thanks,
    Jeremy
     
  4. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Jeremy,

    There's a reason I speak in the metaphoric terms I use. Buttery is the result... you're looking for the process. Okay, it could mean different things to different people.

    That's the point.

    ML
     
  5. KJaeger

    KJaeger Pianissimo User

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    I always thought this would be an easy passage to play - until I had to tackle it for a concert band arrangement last year!

    The mental "sound picture" I remembered was something I had heard once before (perhaps it was Herseth or even Solti who described it? I am sure it is a well-known description...) - that is to think of the sound of a piano, with just a hint of an attack followed by the decay until the next note. Sort of like the hammers of the piano striking the strings...

    Not that I could actually produce that sound LOL - but that's what I was going for... :oops:

    (I'm thinking I heard Solti describe this on the "In Rehearsal" video he did with CSO and this piece...)
     
  6. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

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    Sam Krauss liked to draw verbal images of passages like this one. The tempo, he thought, should be like a leisurely stroll through a museum. He used a "they" sound for the attacks. Sing it though a few times. Don't let technique get in the way of the music, rather let the music tell you what to do.
    Wilmer
     
  7. sublmbadfish

    sublmbadfish Pianissimo User

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    Jul 9, 2004
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    I think that piano visual was solti to Herseth. I believe i heard that about when Herseth first joined the CSO. My teacher who studied with Herseth told me this story...or at least I think.
     
  8. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

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    That would have been a great spot for Bruno Labate :lol:

    Wilmer
     
  9. dcstep

    dcstep Mezzo Piano User

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    Makes a lot of sense when you consider that the piece was originally written for piano. I forgotten that and it will be useful when playing it in the future.

    Dave
     
  10. dcstep

    dcstep Mezzo Piano User

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    That was so helpful, now tell me what image you use for the Godenberg and Schmuyle movement.

    Dave
     

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