The single best trumpet advise ever!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Walter, Jan 12, 2007.

  1. B15M

    B15M Forte User

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    Dec 30, 2003
    Monroe Ct.
    I wouldn't do that if I were you
     
  2. Ed Kennedy

    Ed Kennedy Forte User

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    Nov 18, 2006
    Jacobs used to say something like that. In his case, as a student at Curtis, it was usually true!
     
  3. Tom Mac

    Tom Mac Pianissimo User

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    Mar 11, 2007
    Nashville Tennessee
    I believe that no pain....NO PAIN!!! I also believe that practice doesn't make perfect it makes permanent. Further, I believe that every time I play someone important is listening......Me. But, I'm just an old man with a lot of trumpets.
     
  4. glorybe

    glorybe Piano User

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    Jul 29, 2009
    I sort of understand that comment about the room ringing. It may strike us all differently but when I play sometimes it as if a horn knows the prior note and somehow that prior note alters the notes that follow in a pleasant way. I can't say that it is not the air around the horn and not the horn itself carrying vibrations from one note to the next. At its most dramatic I will get distracted in practice and depress the wrong valve but my lip auto bends the wrong note into the correct pitch and timbre. I doubt that I could do that deliberately no matter how hard I tried but the mind throat and lip can somehow go on autopilot every once in a while.
     
  5. glorybe

    glorybe Piano User

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    Jul 29, 2009
    Have most of you played on old church floors or dance halls with old wood floors? They didn't have as many joists holding up those floors years ago and it was as if the entire wood floor became part of the instruments and the floor would make the music great. It was almost if those floors were the surface of a great guitar and the bands would stand on that guitar and get it on. The saxophone could somehow really stand out in that environment and make the whole building rock. I think I prefer the wonderful accidental musical environment of those old buildings than the newer, sound engineered performance centers. Sometimes even a piano could seem to shake those buildings.
     
  6. trpt2345

    trpt2345 Mezzo Forte User

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    May 21, 2006
    Morelia, Mexico
    From Barbara Butler: "Breath!" "Play to the end of the phrase".
     
  7. trpt2345

    trpt2345 Mezzo Forte User

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    May 21, 2006
    Morelia, Mexico
    This is incredibly wrong. Sports analogies are completely inappropriate. If you're hurting and bleeding you're doing something really wrong. Rest more. Always end a session when you're fatigued or feeling pain. Rest until you recover, then continue. The effort needed to play the trumpet is way, way different from the effort needed for sports and to conflate the two is to wander into error.
     
  8. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
    Also, "Being a nice person is more important than a being great trumpet player."
    --
    Didn't Buddy Rich say this?
     
  9. Mark B

    Mark B Pianissimo User

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    Aug 20, 2010
    Redlands, CA
    Possibly...... That right there.;-)

    Mark
     
  10. glorybe

    glorybe Piano User

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    Jul 29, 2009
    I certainly agree that pain is to be avoided. Pain hurts! It does not help.
    The person who raised me read me that children's story about the little red engine that could. It used the mantra I think I can over and over. Childhood instructions are sometimes a bit generalized but when it comes to playing a trumpet, or any other instrument, that ability to keep on trying, while being seriously stubborn over the years works and works quite well. Pick up a horn and practice and play and play and over the years you will get it down right. I just listened to an old soldier who landed on Omaha Beach at D Day. For those that don't know Omaha Beach was as bad as it can get. The old fellow remarked that he was absolutely certain he was a dead man and would never make it up that beach. It was all hell to pay and staying alive one grain of sand at a time until that beach was taken. Matter of fact a whole lot of good men never even reached the beach as they perished in the water. But at the end of the day most men did survive on that beach and were still fighting strong. So for the kids picking up a horn for the first time it should be fun but still the ones that are still hammering away, inch by inch at the end of the day will win. Sometimes that even means changing instruments after years of trying. The fellow that can't quite sing on a trombone may have a better feel for a trumpet. Only through staying and trying and trying again does one get it.
     

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