THE sound

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Bear, Sep 19, 2005.

  1. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Back to the subject of equipment, I would never have thought that it would have made that big of a difference, but some equipment is better suited to getting certain types of sound than others.

    Bell shape, bell flare, bell material, leadpipe, mouthpiece cup size, backbore configuration - they don't necessarily have a big impact on "your" sound, but what they will do is make it easier or harder for the player to produce the sound they have in their head.

    That being said, the combination of player>mouthpiece>trumpet is the best setup I have played to date for the rock and roll horn lines I'm playing these days. I wouldn't use this setup in a quintet, but for nailing horn hits, it's perfect.
     
  2. Bear

    Bear Forte User

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    oops... I thought I typed "darn" did somethign else slip? lol. Sry. Anyways, I was just thinkin about the buzz and how our bodies are really the instrument and the actual instrument is just an amplifier. And concerning sound it just surprised me that some people cannot make a buzz and have a great sound, and someone who can buzz all day, also has a great sound... so I was just wonderin how it all fit together... does that make any sense? See the things I think about when I have way too much free time?
     
  3. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Bear, I think that every trumpet player has a "buzz", it's just that some of them are incapable of producing it outside of the mouthpiece. Does that make sense?

    I think that your description of the musician being the player and the equipment being the amplifier is pretty good - if you are playing equipment that hinders you, it won't properly amplify what you are trying to do with it.

    Bear, the edit that I made in your post was where you quoted me - I altered it to match my altered post, thus pulling the brand names out. ;-)
     
  4. Billy B

    Billy B Pianissimo User

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    Expensive.
     
  5. Bear

    Bear Forte User

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    ok trickg, so you lost me.

    1. How can someone not be able to a buzz... also, another question... are you of the school that the buzz ought to be the way you play or is there a differential that happens between the buzz and when you put teh axe on your chops. Hope that makes sense.. This is a fun discussion.

    2. So I switch off from trumpet to bone and whatever... some people have a problem doing this.. Why so if the buzz ought to be the same, or should it?
     
  6. Tom_MacNiven

    Tom_MacNiven Pianissimo User

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  7. Bear

    Bear Forte User

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    Just hit the "qoute" button on the top right of the screen...

    I like your explanation about sound vs tone.

    It's interesting how each of the players you mentioned (Wynton, Freddie, Lee Morgan, etc) have distinctively different sounds, but when you make your sound, they all mesh together... That's what I'm talkin' about, that's just kewl.

    I have Thad Jones/Mel Lewis orch blastin' in the background... Awesome stuff, lol...
     
  8. BigBadWolf

    BigBadWolf Piano User

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    This is how to do it:
    Code:
    [quote="Tom_MacNiven"]p.s. how do you make a quote come up in a white box? This is the first time I've ever quoted someone.  :-)[/quote]
     
  9. Tom_MacNiven

    Tom_MacNiven Pianissimo User

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    Code:
    [quote=Bear]I have Thad Jones/Mel Lewis orch blastin' in the background... Awesome stuff, lol...[/quote]
    
    Yeah that's a swingin' big band all right!!!!!
    
    Thanks BigBadWolf I understood that eventually!!
     
  10. Derek Reaban

    Derek Reaban Mezzo Piano User

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    Bear,

    Like you, I’ve done a lot of thinking related to “buzzingâ€. There are so many very successful players and teachers that advocate all of the different types of buzzing that there must be some common denominator that ties them all together.

    In addition to the reading that I have done, I have experimented with each type of buzzing. I found that applying the idea of the breath attack [starting the sound with only the air (no tongue)] was extremely helpful. In the lip buzzing that I did (years ago), I found that this made my chops extremely stiff (I did way too much of this). When I did lip buzzing with a breath attack and limited it to only a minute or two a day, I had better results. With that said, I have not done any lip buzzing in the last 3-4 years, and I don’t think I will add it back into my routine again.

    Mouthpiece buzzing applied in the proper way can be extremely beneficial. Figuring out how to do it correctly will lead to clear benefits in improving your sound. Read what James Thompson, James Stamp, and Don Jacoby have to say about it below. I currently buzz my mouthpiece about once a week using the James Thompson Buzzing Basics book. I like his approach very much, but I use this less often than I used to.

    Playing the leadpipe, as described by Bill Adam in the quote at the bottom of this post has been extremely helpful for me to find more resonance and center in my sound. I do this several times a day, and have found that it encourages the “soft center†that so many players and teachers describe without any of the stiffness that can creep in if doing mouthpiece or lip buzzing incorrectly.

    For all of these approaches I follow the “cooling the soup†(firm corners) or emphatic “tooh†that Manny describes. Along with a great internal sound concept, these ideas have been very helpful to me.

    I hope you find what you are looking for in the words of these great players/teachers:


    Breath Attacks (The Common Denominator)

    Carmine Caruso
    The breath attack is used in this initial exercise because it is the quickest way to get the lips in focus, to get them touching.

    David Hickman
    One of the most effective methods of developing correct tone production is through the use of breath attacks. Commencing the tone without the aid of the tongue will require the embouchure and throat to be relaxed and efficient.

    James Stamp
    Learn to buzz the lips without using the tongue to start the first note.

    Charlie Vernon
    Use a 'ho' syllable to articulate each note. This exercise aids the lips to vibrate the desired pitch more readily.

    Bob Findley
    [For the exercises] All breath attacks - don't use the tongue to start or stop a note".

    Donald Reinhardt
    Hoo (Breath Attack) for the first exercises – Warmup #57.




    James Stamp

    â€If done correctly [lip buzzing] helps a student to get a bigger range of color in his or her tonal spectrum."

    "Proponents of the Stamp buzzing concept find that when they are buzzing correctly their sound is more colorful, they are more flexible, warm up faster, and are more consistent players from day to day."

    Stamp on Lip and Mouthpiece Buzzing - "Stay as loose as possible in the center of the lip while buzzing".


    James Thompson

    "As you practice on the mouthpiece [the reduced resistance compared to the trumpet] tend to let the lips relax and buzz more freely into the mouthpiece... As the lips become less tense the tone from the mouthpiece will become fuller, with more overtones sounding."

    "While buzzing, the lips need to be relaxed, not tense."


    Charles Vernon

    "Always strive for a focused, centered, free sounding [mouthpiece] buzz in all registers. Using a lip vibrato helps to focus the sound."

    Don Jacoby

    "Only the corners should be firm, the part of your chops inside the mouthpiece should stay relaxed".



    Bill Adam on Leadpipe Buzzing

    "I know there has to be a certain amount of mouthpiece buzzing to warm up the resilience that we have to have here. But, if we can set the mouthpiece and tube in vibration, the embouchure is much more relaxed. What we're trying to do is to get the air through that horn with the least amount of tension and the least amount of muscle."
     

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