Their own distinctive sound?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Trumpet-Golfer, Mar 29, 2010.

  1. Trumpet-Golfer

    Trumpet-Golfer Pianissimo User

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    I've always thought the late great Eddie Calvert had a sound all of his own. Heres Eddie playing Il Silenzio:
    YouTube - Eddie Calvert plays 'Il Silenzio'

    Which Trumpeters do you think had the most recongnizable sound?

    Trumpet-Golfer
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Here are those that I can identify blindfolded with earplugs:
    Maurice André
    Al Hirt
    Miles Davis
    Rafael Mèndéz
    Clyde McCoy
    Heinz Zickler
    Lois Armstrong
    Dizzy
    Harry James
    Timofei Dokschizer
    Bill Vacchiano
    Charlie Schlueter
    Armondo Ghitalla
    John Wilbraham
    Walter Scholz
     
  3. mchs3d

    mchs3d Mezzo Forte User

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    Provo, UT
    I think Roger Voisin's sound was distinguishable above most others. And, of course, my teachers' sounds are very distinguishable to my ear.
     
  4. EdMann

    EdMann Mezzo Forte User

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    In addition to the above, Maynard can be id'd in seconds, Gozzo, Herseth (certainly playing Mahler's 5th), Lin Biviano, Chet, Jack Sheldon, Freddie.

    ed
     
  5. Pedal C

    Pedal C Mezzo Forte User

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    Jan 24, 2005
    You're right, Rowuk. There is no mistaking "Lois" Armstrong! :)

    For most easily recognized...I'd have to vote for "Lois," Mendez and probably MF. Although, with enough listening, most any top shelf player becomes pretty unique sounding.
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Actually I find most of the "modern" symphonic players closer in sound anyway than other types of players. If you really get to know them intimately, of course you will hear the small stylistic differences, but casually, most likely not. I remember the album the glory of Gabrieli with Chicago, Philadelphia and Cleveland - pretty "uniform" approach across the board.

    If we listen to Maurice Andrés students we also have some real similarities too.
    I hear Chicago compared to New York or Boston more in the string sound. Maybe we can blame the merry go round of guest conductors?
     

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