Thick lips/ mouthpiece question

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Roshoka, Jul 31, 2013.

  1. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    ???
     
  2. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    ???
     
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I have been only posting philosophical truth in my responses... not sarcasm... when I use sarcasm, you'll know it.
     
    Juarez-MA likes this.
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    To make money... to make lots of money:dontknow:
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    What the heck does that have to do with making lots of mouthpieces... still like my answer better.
     
  6. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Gmonady answers the burning question:
    "What part of the mouthpiece makes articulation easier?
    "The part that you play the trumpet with".
    --------------------
    Snarky in the key of funny!!
    But seriously, The size of one's lips are of little consequence when it comes to trumpet playing. to support this, look at Alison Balsom's lips and compare them to Wynton Marsalis' lips. Two factors that can have a negative effect on trumpet playing are how the teeth and or palate are formed. Occasionally (not often) the teeth or palate will be so misaligned/ malformed that trumpet playing becomes even more of a challenge and in some cases, impossible. As for the placement of the mouthpiece on the lips, a lot of that has to do with what register you are in. I'm guessing by the nature of your question that you are just starting out so please accept that this might be a little hard to understand so here's a little visual that might help:
    These visuals are based on what you would consider upper, normal, and lower register:
    (/) = upper register (|) = normal register (\) = lower register. These are approximates and some individuals tend to move their heads (Ferguson) and some tend to move their bell (Marsalis) but the results are still the same.
    As for not being able to play certain notes, I always refer to the basics sheet to see if the person is getting in their own way before recommending any equipment changes. Why? If it's a problem with mechanics, then the problem will arise again once the "honeymoon period" is over with the new piece of equipment.
    Dr.Mark
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2013
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Thank you Dr. Mark
     
  8. graysono

    graysono Mezzo Forte User

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    Lead guy in our big band spent a few minutes with a Stomvi rep in re mpcs. He said it was much like getting an eye exam. In 10 min his problem was diagnosed and Stomvi built him a new mpc. I can testify personally that he has been reborn. The Gs one octave above the staff last night were cutting edge. Point? Get some pro help. Aside: there are many great players of history, think Cat Anderson, Clifford Brown et al who had extremely fat chops. But, and here it is: their chops didn't protrude into the mpc at all. so some diagnosis for you should be your first step.
     
  9. 48' Olds "Special"

    48' Olds "Special" New Friend

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    Sorry gmonday bugs me, his remarks don't add any to the conversation
    I picked this MP up when I bought an Estate sell trumpet
     

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