Thin in the high range

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by WhatIsHip?, Jun 13, 2007.

  1. WhatIsHip?

    WhatIsHip? Pianissimo User

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    Jun 4, 2007
    Guilford, CT
    Hey guys,
    So I'll be playing along with a good lead sound, but then I end to the high end, when I get to around high E's, my sound diminishes and loses some complex.
    Suggestions??
    Could it be too much pressure, not enough air, good ol' practice?
    Thanks
    Greg
     
  2. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Yup, probably is. :lol:



    If it isn't, then it's probably in your head, which may or not be a quick fix. Sometimes our body fools us into thinking "high" = "hard." Try this:

    Play an E major scale going up to your high e and observe the sound, feel, etc. Do the same with an A major scale (a fourth higher), and once again observe. It doesn't matter if you make it to the high a or not, but how was that high e this time? The same? If so, it is probably too much pressure, not enough air, and/or practice. Have fun, and don't hurt yourself!
     
  3. WhatIsHip?

    WhatIsHip? Pianissimo User

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    Jun 4, 2007
    Guilford, CT
    My main priority is to not hurt myself. I will let you know how it works.
     
  4. WhatIsHip?

    WhatIsHip? Pianissimo User

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    Jun 4, 2007
    Guilford, CT
    what would you all recommend for range studies?
     
  5. Bear

    Bear Forte User

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    Range studies? What are you interested in? Good melodies? Transpose them up and up. Scales? Same thing. Favorite Etudes? Same thing... get the picture? Just try for a great sound, tons of air, and only enough pressure to seal the contact points between your horn (read your mouth, because WE are the musical instrument) and that hunk of metal in your hands.
     
  6. tobys346

    tobys346 New Friend

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    Nov 14, 2006
    Playing melodies an octave up is a good way to judge your sound but you should really use a tape recorder so your ears and head don't fool you into thinking the wrong things about your tone being thin. Tape recorders don't lie and you will also build endurance and control in that register. As always rest as much as you play and don't overplay (too loud, too much pressure etc). One more thing, buy a mouthpiece visualizer so you can observe your apeture. It could be that you are stretching or smiling your embouchure which will definately give you a thin sound and affect your endurance. Practice your scales two octaves mf and strive for relaxation. Good luck!
     
  7. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Top Tones are on just about everybody's must play lists. A good exercise at the beginning and some o.k. etudes.
     
  8. Al Innella

    Al Innella Forte User

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    Aug 9, 2007
    Levittown , NY
    study with teacher who can play dblcs &better.it could be the way you are using your lips in the mouhpiece.if you are doing it right it wont matter what book you use
     
  9. gdong

    gdong Piano User

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    Jun 7, 2008
    LA/Lake Tahoe/NYC
    Jim Thomson's "Buzzing Basics" are a godsend. I did them for 4 years staring from a complete embouchure switch. they generate your air, and plenty of gas! I highly recommend it, but it takes dedication and persistence!

    Also, make sure you are fundamentally set up to be able to play in the upper register. I was all messed up in this regard, spend 5 years of my life practicing 10X as much as everyone else to get the same progress. Had an awesome teacher help me switch and threw in buzzing basics as the medicine. I'm happier than ever now!
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2008
  10. screamingmorris

    screamingmorris Mezzo Forte User

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    Apr 4, 2007
    It can be:

    1. your embouchure type (upstream tends to have thinner tone)
    2. mouthpiece (for example, cup too shallow, or throat too tight)
    3. trumpet (for example, bore too small)
    4. lack of embouchure muscle development
    5. natural thinning around every player's present highest range
    6. using too little mouthpiece pressure (per Reinhardt's observation)
    7. playing too softly
    8. some combination of any or all of the above

    - Morris
     

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